Embossed Wood Pendants

by Dina Kowal

Create a handmade pendant with a raised pattern.

Supplies

Step-by-Step

  1. Step 1

    Prepare a wood medallion for use as a pendant. The one pictured was pre-drilled – other pieces may need to be drilled and sanded before painting. For ease of assembly, the hole should be at least 1/4" across.

    Choose an acrylic craft paint for the base coat.

  2. Step 2

    Give the wood piece an even coat of paint on all surfaces. Allow the paint to dry completely.

  3. TIPS:
    A darker color works nicely for the base coat.
    For mass production, use spray paint.
    Use a heat tool lightly to speed the drying process.

  4. Step 3

    Ink up a patterned background stamp with embossing ink.

  5. Step 4

    Coat the embossed image with clear embossing powder.

  6. Heat set to activate the powder.

  7. Step 5

    Using your finger, rub a very small amount of lighter-colored acrylic paint onto the embossed surface. The embossed pattern is raised, and will resist the paint, allowing the base color to show through.

  8. Use a baby wipe to remove any excess paint from the embossed pattern.

  9. Step 6

    Use a metallic ink, paint or paste to highlight the edges of the medallion. Blend as needed.

  10. Step 7

    Coat the medallion with a clear varnish or sealant on all surfaces. Allow it to dry completely.

  11. Step 8

    Prepare a metal charm by adding a small (4mm) jump ring, and then a larger ring (6mm). Pliers are useful for opening the rings up and also ensuring a tight closure.

  12. Ensure that the top ring will lay flat, allowing the charm to also lay flat against the wood medallion.

  13. Step 9

    Prepare a 36” length of cording. Find the center and fold it there. Run the center point through the top ring on the charm from front to back.

  14. Insert the cording through the hole in the medallion from front to back, and pull the ends of the cord through the loop to secure the charm to the medallion with a knot.

  15. Step 10

    Adjust the charm and ring as needed so that it hangs flat against the medallion.

  16. Step 11

    For a fixed-length necklace, tie the ends of the cord in a knot for a closure.

  17. Step 12

    For an adjustable length necklace, overlap the ends about 4". Wrap one end around the other side, and tie a knot, looping back, over, and through.

  18. Repeat the process with the other end, tying it around the cord on the other side. (See video for clarity.)

  19. Step 13

    The knots will be able to slide on the cord, allowing the length to be adjusted.

  20. Step 14

    Complete the project.

Video!

Variations

  1. Experiment with different color combinations and stamped patterns!

    Try the embossing technique on another wood, chipboard or kraft item!

Your Turn

You've seen the tutorial, now you try it! We've got a section of the gallery set aside for Embossed Wood Pendants. Try this technique, then upload your artwork to the gallery. Show us your creations!

***Please note - Internet Explorer/Edge is not a supported browser, and will not allow you to see the videos. Please use Chrome, Firefox or Safari to view our tutorial videos.

Questions and Comments

We'd love to get your feedback or questions. Leave your comment below.

Love this. Think I'll also try making matching earrings, using a smaller wooden circle.
Deb Hook  |  Wed Jul 4, 2018 at 1:51 PM
I love how simple and quick this necklace is to make, and so charming. wink I especially love the knotting for the adjustable length. Thank you so much, Dina!
Julie Sweet  |  Wed Jul 4, 2018 at 6:06 PM
Hello, where did you purchase the wood medallion?
Patti  |  Thu Jul 5, 2018 at 9:00 AM
Hi Patti! They're similar to these on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/listing/521093992/natural-wood-pendants-40mm-20pcs-wood
dina  |  Thu Jul 5, 2018 at 11:05 AM
I just found this, and I LOVE it! I need to find some wood shapes (I know I have them and go play!
Julia  |  Mon Jul 9, 2018 at 9:40 AM
What brand and type of sealant did you use? some spray acrylic seals I have used remained sticky when I used them on acrylic paint or poly-clay.
Suzanne Johnson  |  Tue Jul 10, 2018 at 2:48 PM

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