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Old 10-26-2009, 07:21 AM   #1
RHS
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Default Need to know the difference

Can someone please help me know when to use certain inks? I have no idea how to tell when to use the dye inks, or the pigment inks or the solvent inks.
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Old 10-26-2009, 07:56 AM   #2
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Dye inks: Fast drying, water-based ink. You'd use this on cardstock for general stamping as long as you don't want to use any wet coloring medium that would cause the ink to run.

Pigment inks: Thicker, fade-resistant ink. Takes much longer to dry and is not recommended on glossy finish paper. Sometimes heat-setting the ink will speed things up, but not always. Pigment ink is great for heat-embossing, a technique where you sprinkle embossing powder over a stamped image and then melt the powder. This gives a raised image. Very cool effect, lol!

Solvent inks are not water-based. And they generally stink, lol! Where dye and pigment inks dry by absorbtion into the paper, solvent inks dry by evaporation and are generally very quick to dry. They can be used on non-porous surfaces like tile, glass, acetate, etc. and you can use any water-based medium to color them in without causing the image to bleed. These will stain your rubber stamps, although that doesn't affect the rubber's quality other than to change its color.

There are so-called hybrid inks these days, such as chalk inks, that have properties of both pigment and dye, and these are great. They dry faster than regular pigment inks but can still be used to emboss. The colors are really vibrant and are generally light-fast.

I'm sure there will be yet another new kind of ink coming out as I finish typing this, lol! Seems like something's coming out every day that's "new and different." If you're not sure what to get, I'd suggest getting a couple of each kind just to play with. That's the best way to get a feel for how they work.

Good luck!
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Old 10-26-2009, 08:05 AM   #3
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Betsy... thanks so much for all the info - that really helps. I've not heard about the hybrid chaulk inks - they sounds neat & will have to try them.
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