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Old 07-14-2010, 10:53 AM   #1
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Default Mod Podge - how to NOT curl paper?

I just discovered ModPodge! I know I know - where have I been? in a cave?

I've heard of it before and I think maybe bought some years ago to use for something but just discovered it for scrapbooking or for altering/embellishing clip boards etc...

I was making a word book and decided to use it to get the paper to stick to the chipboard .... but, found that the paper wanted to keep lifting and then it would start to curl... something i'd expect a bit of since i'm in essence 'wetting' the paper with a glue type substance... wondering if anyone has any advice? I'm I maybe adding too much MP or too little? i just used it on the bottom of the paper - i.e the side that I needed to stick to the chipboard - is that the issue? does it need to be applied on top too?

and if need to do the top and bottom of the paper do I need to let the bottom dry before doing the top or do it while it is wet?
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Old 07-14-2010, 10:59 AM   #2
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I usually just added to the back part of the paper and then add to chipboard, never hard any problems with it curling. I'm thinking maybe the paper is to thin or too much modpodge
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Old 07-14-2010, 12:01 PM   #3
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I use a brayer to really 'tighten' it all up. Pop the MP on the chipboard, put the paper on, brayer and brayer some more. If the paper wrinkles at all then it's too much MP. It doens't need a thick layer.
I have put the top cover on before the bottom one was dry but usually wait.
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Old 07-14-2010, 01:44 PM   #4
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Modge Popge! You either love it or you hate it.

Thicker paper works better. I have lots of problems if I use the thinner (like Michael's) designer paper. I rarely have problems when I use a SU! quality paper. I 'paint' the modge podge on the item I am decorating, and yes, not too much, but not too little! Make sure it isn't lumpy either. Then put your paper on it, and you do need to brayer or rub it down a bit. The brayer (or a wallpaper roller) will work well for that.

Sometimes you may see bubbles, but if you have brayered well, those will usually go away.

I seal AFTER it is dry. I get rushed a lot and if I put a coat on when its still wet from adhering the paper, then I have big problems!

Play with it a bit, see what amount of modge podge makes it work. And be patient, because it really is a good sealer and glue. Just can be tricky and messy, but who doesn't love mess! I also think we (and by we I mean me) play/work/whatever with the project too much. Adhere your paper, brayer and all that, put it some place where your cat won't lay on it (hmmm) and leave it alone. Come back to it in an hour or so. Should be dry to seal (coat the top with modge podge).
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Old 07-15-2010, 08:11 AM   #5
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Whether I am mp'ing a clipboard or chipboard I put mp on and let it dry. By doing this it seems to seal the item and takes the paper better. Once I am ready for paper I put mp on my item, then the paper. I too use a brayer to push out the air bubbles. There are times when I have air bubbles and sometimes when the mp dries the bubbles are gone.

HTH,
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:13 AM   #6
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It might be putting the MP on the paper itself is the problem, especially if it's thinner paper. I usually just apply the MP to the service I want to cover, lay the paper on top, rub or brayer to smooth out wrinkles. Let dry. Add top coat to seal.
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Old 07-15-2010, 11:03 AM   #7
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I always use water with MP and have much less problems with it. I also usse a brayer to smooth out, as others have suggested. I have one brayer that I use just with MP, as it gets messed up.

I use a lot of thinner type papers and the way I apply MP is messy but less problems in the end for me.

I have a water mister and first mist the pattern side, not saturate, and right away the paper will curl. Then I turn it over and mist the side to get the MP, then the paper uncurls. I spread on the MP with a credit card, any straight edge will do. It should be well covered all over wit the MP. Thhen I put the paper on the project and immediately smooth over, from the center out, with the brayer. Be careful throughout as misted paper is more delicate to handle. HTH
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Old 07-15-2010, 11:09 AM   #8
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Oh, I was going to add, in place of a brayer you can use a moist sponge. Using MP seems to be similar to wallpapering. And I always wait until it is completely dry before putting on sealing coats.
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Old 07-16-2010, 05:57 PM   #9
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I always put Mod Podge on the back of the paper and the surface you want it glued to. You have to work fast because it dries very quickly. A brayer helps a lot to get it stuck down well.
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Old 07-21-2010, 04:58 AM   #10
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Default Adhereing paper to chipboard with no bubbles or wrinkles

"Yes" Paste is the best I've ever used for these type applications. It's inexpensive, dries quickly, a little goes a long way and your paper will dry absolutely flat....they guarantee it on their jar and I can tell you from personal experience it does exactly what they say it will do. After I adhere my paper to my chipboard, I do brayer it, but I really don't think it is necessary.
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Old 07-21-2010, 07:54 AM   #11
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Quote:

Originally Posted by jrdouglasView Post
"Yes" Paste is the best I've ever used for these type applications. It's inexpensive, dries quickly, a little goes a long way and your paper will dry absolutely flat....they guarantee it on their jar and I can tell you from personal experience it does exactly what they say it will do. After I adhere my paper to my chipboard, I do brayer it, but I really don't think it is necessary.
I've heard good things about the Yes paste. Can you use it on all the same surfaces as MP? Do you seal your project in any way when you are done? I am still pondering how to do some (tin) recipe boxes. I want to have them so they can be damp sponged if they get splattered or messed up in some way, but I don't want to have a heavy, coated feeling to my papers on the box. One time we had a school project that required a coating of MP and it got sticky feeling. It had that same sticky kinda of feeling even years later. I would like to avoid the same problem with my recipe boxes. It would be nice to protect the surface without it looking like it is coated with something.... so the paper still looks like plain paper. Any ideas on how to do this?
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Old 07-21-2010, 08:59 AM   #12
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Quote:

Originally Posted by annie*View Post
I've heard good things about the Yes paste. Can you use it on all the same surfaces as MP? Do you seal your project in any way when you are done? I am still pondering how to do some (tin) recipe boxes. I want to have them so they can be damp sponged if they get splattered or messed up in some way, but I don't want to have a heavy, coated feeling to my papers on the box. One time we had a school project that required a coating of MP and it got sticky feeling. It had that same sticky kinda of feeling even years later. I would like to avoid the same problem with my recipe boxes. It would be nice to protect the surface without it looking like it is coated with something.... so the paper still looks like plain paper. Any ideas on how to do this?
If I need to seal something, I use Kamar Varnish, which is labeled for sealing oil or acrylic artwork. A friend of mine is an artist and recommended it. It's non-yellowing and won't change the look of the artwork...you can't even tell you have sealed the art. (she used it on some original artwork she painted for my home) It also allows for cleaning the artwork later on with a damp cloth and not damaging the original. I bought a can of it at Hobby Lobby (with a coupon it's really inexpensive and Michael's probably has it, too). You might want to test it on a sample of your chipboard/paper before using it on your final project. I haven't had any problems using it to seal chalks, inks, etc....i.e. anything that could rub off or fade over time. Good luck! Also, the Yes Paste is very sticky, but cleans up with soap and water very easily. I use disposable brushes or foam brushes and just throw them away when finished with my paste...at $.20 per brush, it's not worth the trouble to clean brushes.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:15 AM   #13
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Quote:

Originally Posted by annie*View Post
I've heard good things about the Yes paste. Can you use it on all the same surfaces as MP? Do you seal your project in any way when you are done? I am still pondering how to do some (tin) recipe boxes. I want to have them so they can be damp sponged if they get splattered or messed up in some way, but I don't want to have a heavy, coated feeling to my papers on the box. One time we had a school project that required a coating of MP and it got sticky feeling. It had that same sticky kinda of feeling even years later. I would like to avoid the same problem with my recipe boxes. It would be nice to protect the surface without it looking like it is coated with something.... so the paper still looks like plain paper. Any ideas on how to do this?
I absolutely love Gesso as a sealer over paper. If you put it on thinly (you may have to thin it with water at bit), it will slightly lighten the color, but the satiny finish when done is marvelous. Use a foam brush, which you can rinse out when done and reuse. It's basicly acrylic, so will be able to be wiped off with a damp cloth.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:41 PM   #14
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I learned this in a book-making class: If you are putting glue on back of paper to cover a piece of book board, to make a cover, etc., you first put the glue on and wait. The paper will curl up. When it flattens out, it's done, and has relaxed and THEN you can put it on the cover, or whatever you're mounting it onto, and it will work great. Sometimes you might need to let that first coat of glue dry, and then, when the paper is no longer curled, you can add the 2nd coat of glue and put it on. Never a problem with it done this way. Often, I don't have to wait for the first coat of glue to dry, just for the paper to uncurl, before mounting it on the chipboard or whatever.
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Old 07-22-2010, 03:40 PM   #15
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Quote:

Originally Posted by annie*View Post
I've heard good things about the Yes paste. Can you use it on all the same surfaces as MP? Do you seal your project in any way when you are done? I am still pondering how to do some (tin) recipe boxes. I want to have them so they can be damp sponged if they get splattered or messed up in some way, but I don't want to have a heavy, coated feeling to my papers on the box. One time we had a school project that required a coating of MP and it got sticky feeling. It had that same sticky kinda of feeling even years later. I would like to avoid the same problem with my recipe boxes. It would be nice to protect the surface without it looking like it is coated with something.... so the paper still looks like plain paper. Any ideas on how to do this?
Annie, you might try MicroGlaze to protect the surface of your recipe cards and box. Its a wax-like product that you can apply with your fingers that makes paper water-resistant and smudge-proof. It can be used for lots of surfaces other than paper, too. If you check their website (MicroGlaze, all purpose protective coating, waterproofing for paper, calligraphy, marbled paper, art supplies, Oregon artist, Estacada, Peggy Skycraft, Skycraft Designs) they even recommend it for recipe cards and cook book covers! Works like a charm and a little goes a long way. I love that there's no mess, no dry time, just apply and your done!

I just rub a small amount onto a recipe card and it's good to go! Splatters and spills wipe right off and it doesn't change the appearance of the paper.
Cool stuff. I get mine from JudiKins.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:15 AM   #16
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subbing
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Old 07-23-2010, 04:53 AM   #17
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GREAT ideas/tips/suggestions...subbing!! Thanks ALL...
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Old 07-23-2010, 10:09 AM   #18
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Quote:

Originally Posted by SadieSouixView Post
Annie, you might try MicroGlaze to protect the surface of your recipe cards and box. Its a wax-like product that you can apply with your fingers that makes paper water-resistant and smudge-proof. It can be used for lots of surfaces other than paper, too. If you check their website (MicroGlaze, all purpose protective coating, waterproofing for paper, calligraphy, marbled paper, art supplies, Oregon artist, Estacada, Peggy Skycraft, Skycraft Designs) they even recommend it for recipe cards and cook book covers! Works like a charm and a little goes a long way. I love that there's no mess, no dry time, just apply and your done!

I just rub a small amount onto a recipe card and it's good to go! Splatters and spills wipe right off and it doesn't change the appearance of the paper.
Cool stuff. I get mine from JudiKins.
This MicroGlaze stuff really looks interesting! The shipping is a little crazy... almost as much as the glaze. Do you know any stores that sell it?
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Old 07-23-2010, 05:20 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by annie*View Post
This MicroGlaze stuff really looks interesting! The shipping is a little crazy... almost as much as the glaze. Do you know any stores that sell it?
Creative Play Stamps has it, and they offer FREE shipping over $50. If you sign up for their email list you will get a $5 off coupon in the response email.

JudiKins MicroGlaze :: Creative Play Stamps - Rubber Art Stamps

I really love them. They have fabulous customer service, they have even special-ordered items for me from their distributors. I also love it that they carry TONS of re-inkers and have excellent prices on Copics plus they carry all the accessories. They have a really great product selection.

That makes it way too easy to get up to the $50!!!

Hope this helps! MicroGlaze is really neat stuff.
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Old 07-30-2010, 04:08 AM   #20
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Old 10-19-2010, 07:56 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by jrdouglasView Post
If I need to seal something, I use Kamar Varnish, which is labeled for sealing oil or acrylic artwork. A friend of mine is an artist and recommended it. It's non-yellowing and won't change the look of the artwork...you can't even tell you have sealed the art. (she used it on some original artwork she painted for my home) It also allows for cleaning the artwork later on with a damp cloth and not damaging the original. I bought a can of it at Hobby Lobby (with a coupon it's really inexpensive and Michael's probably has it, too). You might want to test it on a sample of your chipboard/paper before using it on your final project. I haven't had any problems using it to seal chalks, inks, etc....i.e. anything that could rub off or fade over time. Good luck! Also, the Yes Paste is very sticky, but cleans up with soap and water very easily. I use disposable brushes or foam brushes and just throw them away when finished with my paste...at $.20 per brush, it's not worth the trouble to clean brushes.
I've been searching high and low for the Kamar Varnish. I looked at Hobby Lobby, Mikes, Dick Blick and a JoAnn Etc. No one seems to have ever heard of it before. Do you know who makes the product, where to find it in the stores, or any other information that might make it easier to find this product? TIA
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:02 AM   #22
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I was at Hobby Lobby this past weekend and decided to do one more search. I found the Kamar Varnish! It is a Krylon product and comes in a can. That was a large part of my problem.... I was looking for a brush on product. I haven't had a chance to test it yet, but I am hoping it will work. I'll let you know what I think of it, after I get a chance to test it out.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:10 AM   #23
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Quote:

Originally Posted by jrdouglasView Post
If I need to seal something, I use Kamar Varnish, which is labeled for sealing oil or acrylic artwork. A friend of mine is an artist and recommended it. It's non-yellowing and won't change the look of the artwork...you can't even tell you have sealed the art. (she used it on some original artwork she painted for my home) It also allows for cleaning the artwork later on with a damp cloth and not damaging the original. I bought a can of it at Hobby Lobby (with a coupon it's really inexpensive and Michael's probably has it, too). You might want to test it on a sample of your chipboard/paper before using it on your final project. I haven't had any problems using it to seal chalks, inks, etc....i.e. anything that could rub off or fade over time. Good luck! Also, the Yes Paste is very sticky, but cleans up with soap and water very easily. I use disposable brushes or foam brushes and just throw them away when finished with my paste...at $.20 per brush, it's not worth the trouble to clean brushes.
Have you tried Kamar Varnish over Copic alcohol markers? Just curious!
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Old 10-25-2010, 01:33 PM   #24
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I use Martha Stewart Decoupage Glue instead of Mod Podge. Like it much better.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:41 PM   #25
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I love my MP too and just recently found a tip on doing the top coat of your project. When your MP is still wet use a paper towel or soft cloth and just tap lightly over the surface of your project. It takes away all those streaks from the paintbrush
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