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Old 10-13-2018, 09:18 AM   #1
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Squirrel The Trouble with Cardstock

In your opinion what cardstock weight is best for handmade greeting cards? For printed-at-home cards?

110 lb measures the same thickness as most store-bought cards I receive, but it doesn't go through many printers used at home.

65 lb seems too flimsy for a card base for stamping/dies, etc.

I've ordered some 80 lb cardstock, but it seems more expensive than heavier stock.

What's a card-maker to do?
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Old 10-13-2018, 09:42 AM   #2
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80 lb Neenah solar white classic crest smooth goes through one of the family printers just fine but not my big HP printer. 110 lb won’t work in either of my printers. I agree 65 is pretty flimsy. I like to use the 110 lb for the card base and layer the 80 lb as a panel or as die cuts to that. That may not fit your style of cardmaking though.
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Old 10-13-2018, 09:48 AM   #3
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I typically layer my cards, 110# for my card base and lower weight for image panel. The paper type is based on printing or stamping and coloring medium. The 65# is great for mats and frames.
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Old Yesterday, 12:28 PM   #4
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~200gsm (grams per square metre) is the standard I use for card bases, because when I do make cards I tend to do piecework and it gets lots of layers. 200gsm goes in our Epson inkjet printer just fine. I have some 300gsm for extra sturdiness required projects, and that does not go through the inkjet.

I can't fathom the US model of paper weight as there's no less than 5+ overlapping systems of 'pound' measurements, and they're all different depending if it's letterstock, coverstock, paperstock, cardstock, etc. Even more insane than the usual 'freedom units' nonsense. I have no idea how you all cope. ;__;
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Old Yesterday, 06:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Embri View Post
~200gsm (grams per square metre) is the standard I use for card bases, because when I do make cards I tend to do piecework and it gets lots of layers. 200gsm goes in our Epson inkjet printer just fine. I have some 300gsm for extra sturdiness required projects, and that does not go through the inkjet.

I can't fathom the US model of paper weight as there's no less than 5+ overlapping systems of 'pound' measurements, and they're all different depending if it's letterstock, coverstock, paperstock, cardstock, etc. Even more insane than the usual 'freedom units' nonsense. I have no idea how you all cope. ;__;

It ain't easy.

For years, I've wished the US paper manufacturers would adopt the gsm standard. I've done this for years, so I know what to look for, but for the newbies, I imagine it could be a nightmare.
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