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Old 03-24-2005, 08:56 PM   #1
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Default things holding me back from being a demo

I was at my demo's house tonight and a few people there told me I should become a demo. I have seriously thought about it, but I have all of these reservations so I want some advice. Here are my problems with it.

1. Creatively, I would do just fine. Business wise--getting customer base, recruiting, etc... makes me extremely nervous. I know no one who stamps besides me. I realize you get help, but how much? how have you gone about building a customer base from nothing?

2. The initial outlay of expenses. I know about the $200 you pay to begin with, but I have to think there is more than just that. You have to buy cardstock and ink for projects for classes, etc... Honestly, how much do you think you spent to get it started? How much do you think you spend now monthly?

3. The disruption in your household. I have a 4 1/2 yr. old and a 14 mo. old and a fairly anti-social husband. Plus the idea of having to have a clean house to have people over for classes, etc... Is this a huge disruption in your life?

4. Because I am so addicted to the creative aspect of it, I'm afraid I wouldn't make any money. At the end of the day, are you making anything? Or are you just breaking even?

5. Extreme stage fright... I don't think it would bother me in small settings...but how nervous are you when you go into new houses with people you don't know?


I would really appreciate your thoughts, demos.

Thanks, Emily
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Old 03-24-2005, 09:14 PM   #2
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It's good that you have thought about all the pros and cons of becoming a demo. I started in Aug. 04 and love it.
I had an open house to 'announce' what I was doing. I had 14 people come, great sales, and one person booked, from this I got a few more bookings. But then that line dried up. My up-line moved and passed her customers to me and I have been going strong since then. I average 4 workshops a month. I have one Stamper's 10 group and am working on getting another together. I have made all the goals I have set for myself and the ones SU sets.
I have a room that was previously used for painting classes and it is large enough for my stamping classes. I have invested a fair amount into replenishing my supplies. I had figured before I signed up I was spending a monthly average of $100 on cards, scrapbooking, wrapping paper, etc. so I decided I could probably make my sales minimums by myself. I haven't had a problem meeting the minimums, they are very reasonable.
I am making money. What I make pays a few bills, and buys all my stamping supplies and needs/wants. I've made some friends, too.
I have 2 children and my daughter loves my SU stuff.
I was super nervous at my open house, and shaking at my first workshop, but now I am doing fine, I love showing everyone what they can do with stamps and I think that helps.
Hope I was of some help.
Kelli
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Old 03-24-2005, 09:18 PM   #3
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Emily,
I also have had this happen to me, where I've had a little pressure to become a demo but have not for many of the same reasons you've listed. I feel a little better now knowing I'm not the only one who is worried about those things. Also, there is another concern I had. I LOVE to stamp (of course) but I think it might take the fun out of it if I'm always taking care of everyone elses stamping needs instead of my own.
And knowing myself, I would want to do it full scale or nothing, which means time and money, initially anyway, would be in the negative.

In the end, knowing myself, I decided it was too much to take on. I buy what I want and can afford just for me, I love my demonstrator, and I have the balance in my life that keeps me healthy and happy. We are all different and I'm thankful there are so many awesome demonstrators out there, but I know I'm not meant to be one, not at this point in my life anyway.

Debbie
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Old 03-24-2005, 09:18 PM   #4
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I had many of the same fears as you when I started. I love the creative aspect of it! I was worried about the building of my customer base but found it just naturally happens. I just started off with parties for close friends and it snowballed from there. When people from work found out I was doing it I started getting people there too. You'll be surprised at how it catches on. I have found that I have an entrepreneurial side I didn't know I had! Also finding that my hubby is really more supportive of this than I imagined he would be!

I would say that I probably spent a lot more in the beginning than I really had to. If you use what is in the starter kit you can do a lot with a little! I'm making money on my business now that I'm working smarter about it and not ordering "everything" I might need!

I'm doing my workshops as a hands on. I demo 1-2 projects and then the other two I will demo and have everyone make with me as I pass supplies around the table. This has helped with my "stagefright". You'll be surprised at how after a year or so of being a demo you get over it! I still get nervous before workshops even after five years but once I'm there it's okay.

Give it a try at least! What have you got to lose? You at least get a great starter kit for a great price! If you don't like it you still come out a winner! Good luck! I hope some of this helps! Email me if you have any questions!
-Theresa

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Old 03-24-2005, 09:20 PM   #5
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Here's what I think. I hope my answers help you with your decision!

1. I was concerned abou the same thing. When I started, there were 2-3 people in my social group that had been to one party prior to my starting. I had my first workshop at my house and basically invited every girl I knew - including all the girls at DH's work. That day I ended up with 4 bookings and (gulp) $1200 in sales. This came as a shock to me. I was hoping for $500 at the most. You really never know what will happen.

2. This all depends on you. I took a loss my first year and spent a lot of money (I don't remember how much), but that was because I really didn't have much to begin with and I couldn't control my spending. That being said, in order to maintain for workshops, I honestly think you can get away with spending no more than $50 a month. However, that takes an iron will, but it can be done.

3. I'm not the best for this one. I've only had 3 workshops at my house in 2 years of demoing. The majority of my workshops are at least 30 miles away.

4. See #2. You can do it, you just have to control your spending. That's the hardest part. But, you can post a loss for at least the first year (that's what a cpa told me). And everyone will tell you, when you recruit, you make more money.

5. I don't have too much problem with stage fright. That being said, most people have a harder time "performing" for their friends than with strangers. Besides, after a couple of workshops (and phone calls) these customers become friends - and it gives your workshop a whole new dimension.

So here's my $.02! I think you would be fine! You have many of the same concerns that I did, and I'm frankly very happy that I made the plunge. So, GO FOR IT!

Allison
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Old 03-24-2005, 09:47 PM   #6
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Default demo or not

I love to stamp and create- I especially love the technique junkies and playing with new ways to be creative.

I have joined swaps for fun, and in knowing the pressure of a swap plus knowing how busy I am, I will NOT sign on to be a demo. It would make me really crazy, and the swaps and demo's would take all of the fun out of it for me. So, the discount is not worth what I would get out of it in my opinion. Plus, I know myself, and I would spend WAY too much $$$.

Hey- the demo's out there need customers too!!!

Good luck with your decision!

Shelly
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Old 03-25-2005, 06:10 AM   #7
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bump
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Old 03-25-2005, 06:39 AM   #8
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Sounds like you've gotten alot of good advice already. But here's my 2 cents worth

The kit and demo discount are worth signing up for as a hobby demo even if you never try to make this a for profit business. Plus you get the monthly Stampin' Success and all the "inside scoop" information.

If you want to make money at it you'll have to recruit and from my experience work very hard and be very, very careful to not re-invest all your profits in your business (unless of course your goal is a loss for tax reasons).

If you're already spending $100 per month than go for it and realize that you'll be saving yourself $20 a month. Then just decide how much work you want to do for that $20 savings and some potential "earnings".

Blessings -- Becky A.
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Old 03-25-2005, 06:48 AM   #9
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Default don't know if I should join

I'll tell you a brief bit about my demo days....

Made great friends with my upline,
Had alot of fun at convention,
loved going to my uplines stamp camps and also her uplines meetings.

personally I didn't pursue the workshops and subsequently was booted out for not making my quota.

WHAT I LOST:
Getting together with my tightnit group of stamper friends.

I am now trying to get another $200 together so I can re-start my business.

So the moral to the story...YES JOIN...YES JOIN IT IS THE MOST FUN THING YOU WILL EVER DO FOR YOUR CREATIVITY AND YOURSELF.
Tammie
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Old 03-25-2005, 06:48 AM   #10
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When I was getting started I was not keen on the idea of disrupting my houselife either so I had my parties as a local pizza party, it worked out great, got me out of the house and gave us lots of table space.
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Old 03-25-2005, 06:54 AM   #11
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Default becoming a demo

Here is my two cents. You have to do what you feel comfortable with. I was very nervous at first. Most of my friends have gotten into stamping. I am not sure why I signed up. I am glad I did as I have meet many wonderful friends (demo and customers). I will be honest you are going to spend a lot more than 50$ a month when you start. The business side does cost money .......and you have to have strong control. I do not so I mostly pay for my addiction. What you need to do since you are a person who is really organized (that would help you) and doesn' t make rash decisions ...... you need to attend some of this person's parties. See what she puts into a show. I do everything hands on - what I do my customers do - so I only show 2 maybe 3 projects. You need to sit down with her and figure out what you will spend to get started ......and if you want to be a demo for ideas do it. You have to do what is right/comfortable for you. Do you know people that might have an interest in stamping - would host a show?!

You need to do what your heart is telling you. Go to this demo and show her her pro's - con's and ask her to go to at least 2 shows with her .......ask her what she does to get ready for a show. It is work and sometimes you don't get to stamp for yourself ......... you and only you needs to decide what will make you happy.

I am happy I have done it. ....but that is me. You have to know yourself .......
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Old 03-25-2005, 07:07 AM   #12
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Lots of good advice here already! I just want to mention that I relate to the issue of an apparently "anti-social" spouse--I think maybe SU! (and other creative outlets!) attracts a disproportionate number of women whose spouses might be described this way. I just want to add that the biggest benefit waiting is the people--uplines, "stamping sisters," workshop guests, etc.

There are lots of good ideas on this site for how to manage resources (office supplies; mileage) to help figure out options--no one has to run their demonstratorship the way their upline runs it, and it's so cool to get ideas from what others are doing.

All that being said, looking at the numbers, starting out and/or working it as a hobby, I really think being a demo is only a business because you are keeping track of income and expenses. I wouldn't count on it bringing in the kind of financial return for your effort that you would get from seasonal work at the mall. Obviously (for me!) it is not about money.

I just hope anyone considering signing up knows its okay to keep in touch with their own comfort range while appreciating the rewards for stretching beyond it.
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Old 03-25-2005, 07:31 AM   #13
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Now, before I start, I should tell you I'm an accountant so here goes the money side of it.

I have a full time job and know that it would be a very long time before I could replace that income from being a demo, so the way I look at it is I figured out how much I would make an hour doing work outside my regular job to pay for my addiction. I set this as my goal for earnings.

Now when I do a workshop, camp, or class, I use this amount as my measure of whether I succeeded or not. I figure in the amount of materials I use, paper and stuff, but don't count the ink, stamps etc because I buy what I want and figure I would buy it anyway so why count it. To figure out the time I use 1 hour for cutting, 1 hour for set-up 1 hour for delivery and then the time of the event. I don't count the time for the design of the projects because again, I do what I want to do and I use the samples for my own.

Bottom line - last night I made $20/hour

And - I tried 2 new techniques, saw a dear friend that had been ill and I hadn't seen (outside of the hospital) for awhile, spent 3 hours chatting and visiting with the ladies

Could I earn $20 an hour doing accounting? Yes, but I do that all day so why at night?

Could I earn $20 an hour working at a craft store to spend time with something I love? Never

Have I lost money over the first year? YES, but it is a tax write-off and I have a wonderful inventory and an excuse to PLAY PLAY PLAY!
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Old 03-25-2005, 07:41 AM   #14
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I also have to put my 2 cents in here.

You do not have to put a lot of money in this business to be successful. I started 4 years ago when my family and I were just living off student loans. I didn't have any extra money to buy anything. I used everything that came in my kit for my first few parties and then I would buy a pack of card stock here and maybe a new stamp set there. You really can be successful with SU by not spending the farm! I have earned 3 cruises and lots more so far and I didn't have to invest soooooooo much in the beginning. You do not "have" to have all the latest to get your customers excited. Just be fun and love what you do. That will rub off on them!
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Old 03-25-2005, 08:12 AM   #15
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I have toyed with the idea of being a demonstrator since the first demo that I attended THREE YEARS AGO!!

I actually came to this site to see what demonstrators were saying about their experiences.

Very good advice.

Thanks for asking this question!!
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Old 03-25-2005, 08:44 AM   #16
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I like being a demo, but I have lost some things I really liked about stamping. First, I usually feel obligated to examine the business side of any stamping investment. I really love the bareback set in the catalog, but I still haven't bought it because none of my customers are horse people. I can't count how many sets I've bought because they demo well. This frustrates me but I can't buy everything.

It creates a dynamic with my family and friends I'm not really comfortable with. I can't invite them to anything involving stamping without them thnking I'm trying to sell them something. All my stamping friends are also my customers. So I feel sometimes like it would be nice to just get together with my friends and stamp, no money involved.

Buying things from other companies. I love stamps of all varieties. I've become increasingly interested in unmounted stamps for the space and money savings aspect. But I can't demo these things. Ma Vinci has some amazing alphabets that are cheap! I can't demo them. I feel like I should be investing money in things I can demo. So I rarely buy alphabets now (although I couldn't resist animal alphabet and collage because they are really unique) even though they are also my favorite because I can't justify spending 50+ dollars on an alphabet when I could get one very similar for 20 from another company.

People can be really rude to business people. I had a couple of customers who weren't friends. They lived a ways away from me and I was OK with that when we set up a workshop. She canceled 3 times before she finally got the date set. Then I show up and the three guests bought about 80 dollars worth of stuff. She bought nothing. NOTHING! If I were in her position I would have saved up some money to be certain that I at least got a workshop levels worth of products from the workshop. Then, when one of her things was backordered, she was rude about it and called constantly and once I got the backordered thing, she would call and say she was going to pick it up but not show. I would offer to drive to her place (a 30 minute drive) and she would say, "No, I'll be in town on X day, I'll get it then." She arranged to pick it up 4 times before she actually showed. This was a lot of headache for a workshop that didn't even reach the minimum level.

I'm still a demo because I like the discount and I love many things about stampin up. But if you are hesitant, take your time to make the decision and realize that sometimes it isn't rosy and wonderful. And most people don't earn the cruise. In fact, most people are lucky to earn great rewards. Honestly, if stampin up had lower minimums, I"d just stop demoing and just buy for myself. I may still yet.

Good Luck in your decision.
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Old 03-25-2005, 09:48 AM   #17
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Being a demo is a great thing and I have never once regretted my decision. StampinUp in my opinion is THE BEST home party business company out there for several reasons, one being because of their integrity and how much they really care about people. If you want to be a hobby demo and get the discount, it's certainly doable and very easy to maintain with just a few customers and maybe a workshop here and there.

Being a more serious demonstrator takes a lot of work, but the rewards are so worth it. I'll have been a demo a year in April and I'm making money. My start up was costly though because I bought tons of stuff I didn't need. That is something you are hearing over and over because it is an easy trap to fall into. You get excited because you want it all and think about all the cute stuff you can demo, etc...

However, I do use a lot of what I bought for demo purposes, because I demo stuff I'll use for myself. I spent about 1500.00 initially to launch my business the way I thought it should be done. I know a serious business can't be built on 200.00 alone. With any business you will have start up costs and will have to work your rear end off. That's just the law of the land. But my start up costs are a very individual thing, just like someone else's start up costs are. Be careful and spend wisely.

The question is really what are you willing to sacrifice to build a serious business? Do you want it bad enough? Are you hungry for it? Or do you just want to be a hobby demo? SU accomodates either one.

I immediately decided I wanted to build a serious business. I want it and I am willing to do whatever it takes to make it happen, even if it takes years and years. I don't have to do this, but I really want to do it and have all the motivation I need to succeed at this.

I sometimes have to sacrifice time with my family, but not much. I am careful how I schedule myself. I sometimes have to clean my house, but that's a good thing! Actually I try to clean my house often, but it helps to have the extra motivation of knowing customers are coming over.

I use my workshops to make my own scrapbook pages. I kill two birds with one stone. I demo things I know I will use later as gifts, or like I said my scrapbooking. This helps keep things fun. I LOVE my customers and have made several good friends doing this. We get together and stamp alot and have a really great time. It's not awkward at all that they buy from me. They love their hobby and they are going to buy supplies anyway, and they don't mind a bit sending their businesses my way. Besides, I save them money. It's a win win situation. Of course I never expect them to buy anything everytime we get together and stamp and they don't. We get together to stamp because it's great fun. They know I'm not out to try and make a quick buck off of them.

If you have hesitation because you don't think you can do it, then don't sign up to build a business. Sign up only to be a hobby demo...it's certainly worth that! Later on you can decide if you want to go somewhere more serious with it. I personally don't think you have a thing to lose by becoming a hobby demo, but I'm so glad not everyone signs up! We still need customers. lol
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Old 03-25-2005, 10:06 AM   #18
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As a demo who has just signed up (and has not yet even received her kit!), I am finding this to be interesting reading.

I appreciate everyone's comments, as I am the type of person who likes to thoroughly think things through before I do anything. And there are things here I would have NEVER thought of.

That being said, I think that new (and not-so-new ) demos have to remember that there is always going to be a downside to every business. My father has been a very successful businessman for 50 years, and when I got involved in my first business and he heard me complaining about this or that, he said, "You are never going to find anything that comes close to being perfect in business."

I'm trying to remember that when it comes to being a demo. I'm trying to remember that all the positives WILL outweigh the negatives -- unless I let it become otherwise. And if it does become too negative, then I'll back out. But in the meantime I will have gotten some GREAT stampin' deals!
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Old 03-25-2005, 10:08 AM   #19
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I have my paperwork filled out but am still thinking about it.

Pros:
1-A very slight discount after my costs
2-Getting the news on new things quickly
3-I can order whenever I want and not have to wait on anyone
4-Access to demo deals
5-I like the product and would buy anyway
6-Meeting nice people

Cons:
1-Business supplies (order forms, etc.) take a huge chunk. Then add on your demo consumable supplies and it takes another chunk. I think that for this reason I will not do workshops. This way I do not buy for these things.
It complicates your tax filing and in some states YOU must file business and occupation taxes outside of sales and income tax (yes you pay income tax on that 20%)
2-My demo told me it took 2.5 years to make a profit due to the above reasons and because she has to keep buying new sets to demo. She says between the mini's, SAB, etc. she puts out lots of money. She says that now after 4 years she pockets about 5% that does not go back into the business after taxes. She said she does an average of $2000 in sales each month for about $100 in true profit.
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Old 03-25-2005, 11:40 AM   #20
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Just wanted to add after reading that last post, that business supplies (order forms, catalogs, etc...) don't really take that much of a huge chunk. For instance, a package of order forms costs 3.95 for 50 forms. If my math is correct, that's about 8 cents a form. Now relate that to the amount of money you can make on each order. Even if someone only spends 4.00, you are still making .80 cents which more than pays for that order form. Of course most orders are going to be much larger than that.

I think it's all relative and you have to look at the big picture. The last poster could sign up to be a hobby demo and be happy getting her discount and the other pros she listed. She may think it's not much, but in time it sure adds up since she is buying the product anyway.

If you want to make a big business out of this, you can certainly do that too and those supplies will not seem so daunting then. Besides at tax time you'll want to have as much as you can to write off and supplies will certainly help with that! Every serious business has a cost of doing business associated with it. This is actually one of the few businesses where overhead is relatively low.
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Old 03-25-2005, 12:00 PM   #21
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She says that now after 4 years she pockets about 5% that does not go back into the business after taxes. She said she does an average of $2000 in sales each month for about $100 in true profit.

Wow, I average about this a month in sales and just the 20% alone means 400.00. It doens't cost me 300.00 a month to run my business. I figure about 80.00 would go towards taxes on 400.00. So that leaves 360.00 and it doesn't cost me much at all each month to run my business...probably way less than 50.00! I wonder what this demo is doing that eats up so much of her profit? I mean this doesn't even include the volume rebate you get back each month from SU. With a volume rebate you get even more. The volume rebate you would get back each month on 2000.00 in personal sales would be 8% of that 2 grand. That's a 160.00 check you get from SU. AND, this doesn't include the override commission you get back on downline either.

So add that 160.00 plus the 400.00 earned on each 2 grand in personal sales(not including downline anything). That's 560.00 a month. It sure doesn't cost that much to run this business nor do taxes eat that much of the 560.00. Like I said before, the overhead is quite low in a business like this. Am I missing something big? Could I be overlooking something? What do you other demos think?
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Old 03-25-2005, 12:12 PM   #22
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Default don't be afraid...TAKE A CHANCE

I know that many of us were nervous and afraid we were going to fail. I was worried about the quota! HA!! I made that with my own orders.

I have a CRAPPY upline who recruited me and dumped me. All she cared about was hooking me. I have recruited several people, all of whom are long-distance from me (I am a military spouse so I am constantly on the move.)

What I do is this: I have an open house every time I move. I give everyone 10% off of their order placed at that WS, and every order goes into a drawing for a stamp gift basket (filled with a hostess set from SAB, a stamped bunch of goodies, a stamp pad, and a CS assortment)...I also talk up SU constantly....

I offer my recruits $100 CASH sign up bonus after SU clears their paperwork. This enables them to offset the cost of the start-up kit or gives them the freedom to re-invest in their business. (Most of them buy more stamps with it!)

How do you find new customers in an area that is saturated with demos? I "advertise" Not in the typical fashion. I carry stamped cards with me EVERYWHERE...I talk about stamping. I constantly ask people what their hobbies are. No matter what hobby they say, I always say "Oh Stampin' Up has the cutest set to make cards for ** (insert hobby)" which gives them the chance to say "What is SU?" or "Oh I love their stuff." and that's my moment to reach out. I am not afraid to talk to anyone. My husband says I could sell ice to Eskimo...I also donate to just about everyone who asks me to. I donate stamp sets and GC's and stamped items. It's a great plug for my business....

The best thing about SU is that if it's not a good fit, you can leave. You've got your kit and you're set. But how many of us later said, "What was I worried about?" I know I did!

The point is this: don't be afraid to fail or goof up. You might be nervous and you might hit a dry spell (we all have) but this stuff literally sells itself...TAKE A CHANCE! Ods are you won't regret it.

Suzanne
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Old 03-25-2005, 12:16 PM   #23
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I agree that whoever is selling $2000 each month and only getting $100 just isn't going about good business practices. I can honestly say that, after 4 years of demoing, I'm finally starting to treat it seriously. I've averaged $1500-2000 monthly in sales but never really saved any money. I was just ordering too much. It's amazing how it adds up quickly. Now I'm allowing myself $50-100 per month for supplies. Truly, you can get by without having several new stamp sets each month. I figure that 1 set each month ought to suffice, two if I really have to have it. The rest goes into CS, SNAIL, etc.

For what it is worth, I got serious about my business because between buying stamps and supplies, Christmas. getting glasses and a new puppy, I put myself into a hole almost $2000 deep. Since I got serious about it (made a commitment to my Lord about it and everything), I'm out of that hole in under 2 months. My sales have been about 50% higher, so that helps, but I am not going back to my old ways.

Also, for the person that was saying that once the s&h and tax were figured in, the 20% discount didn't amount to much... you can't reason like that since you'd have to pay s&h and tax if you were just a customer.

You can make money at this business, but you have to be willing to look at things from a business point of view and not "reason" your way into spending money you don't have. Take that from someone who has "been there, done that."
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Old 03-25-2005, 12:30 PM   #24
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I think the MAIN thing you have to remember is you don't have to have EVERYTHING! Yes, it's nice to have the new sets from the mini catalogs that are coming out so you can demo with them; but you don't HAVE to have them. I have been a demo for 8 years and rarely do I buy even one set from the mini; unless I REALLY like it. (I bought 2 sets from the current spring mini because I really liked them...and they will be sets that I will keep even if they are not in the upcoming catalog - which is why I have a hard time buying them. If they are not in next years catalog then they sit and collect dust or are traded for a current set.)

As it has been said many times before.....you have to practice CONTROL! Is your upline close by? Borrow some sets from her rather then buying everything you like! It does cost a little at the beginning; but the starter kit has everything you will need to do a couple of shows--including the order forms.

SU! also has great incentives to earn FREE stuff. Free merchandise and free stamp sets. Of course this is based on your sales and the sales requirements for 1st level incentives are fairly low.

When I first signed up I moved within 2 months and remember having to buy my own stuff just to keep active (the minimums were monthly rather then quarterly). Now I have customers that just call or email with an order and they keep me active (along with my workshops).

This business can do what YOU want it to do. You have the freedom to schedule parties or workshops when YOU want to have them. If you want family time-don't schedule a workshop during that time. I too have two small children (6 year old and 2 year old) My time at my workshops is 1) my time away from the kids (I'm a stay at home mom); and 2) My kids time to spend with their dad (which they don't get a lot of "dad" time without mom around. It's good for all involved!

Hope this helps a little....Sorry I rambled on for so long. If you have any questions I might be able to answer let me know! I'll try to be more short and to the point!
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Old 03-25-2005, 12:40 PM   #25
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Quote:

Originally Posted by stampysister
It creates a dynamic with my family and friends I'm not really comfortable with. I can't invite them to anything involving stamping without them thnking I'm trying to sell them something. All my stamping friends are also my customers. So I feel sometimes like it would be nice to just get together with my friends and stamp, no money involved.
I find this interesting. I responded to the original post last night after I came back from an afternoon of "just stamping" with a customer/hostess that I met in September. I have another group of girls that I scrap with who were first customers and are now friends. I just enjoy the company and I hope they do too! I'm sorry that you feel this way and I do understand, because I used to feel the same way in the past. Somehow, I've been able to cross that line and it's not really a concern anymore.

This is something that the business has changed for me. I'm actually quite shy and uncomfortable around new people, but now I'm finding it easier to get to know people better and make real friends.

So back to the OP, I do think you would be fine, and I think that you should try it. Just ask yourself, "What have I got to lose?" If people have said this is something you should do, then they're probably right.
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Old 03-25-2005, 01:48 PM   #26
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I don't know if you are looking for a career or a hobby so I am answering as a hobby demo. I was in a stamper's six club. I had been thinking about demoing for a while but had no idea where I would get customers. My demo then told me I would get to keep my stamp group as my own customers( everyone in the group are cousins and also friends). This helped make my decision. I signed up. My group meets every other month and I don't have a ton of sales but I meet my quartely minimums and I usually earn great rewards during Sell-a-Bration. I only spend the 20% that I earn from my customers on stamp stuff. I explained to my husband that this was my hobby and instead of taking money out of our regular budget, I would sign up and demo so my hobby would not cost any $$ out of our pocket. I am a stay at home mom so this helps me to get the things I want w/o feeling guilty for spending $$. I have stamp camps at my house about every three months. I do three projects in two hours. My husband is also an anti social. He just takes the kids and goes to visit his parents. Sometimes I feel pressure to come up with GREAT ideas to show my cousins and that makes it not so fun. I have been trying lately to do more "for fun" projects in my down time so that when I have a club meeting comming up, I can pull out something I made w/o the pressure and just cut the stuff for it. This has helped to make it fun again. I also like meeting w/ my friends for the afternoon. We take turns having it at everyones house so no ones husband has to deal w/ us every time. I have been doing this for almost two years and I still really enjoy it. I can't tell you what to do but I hope this helps!
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