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Old 07-03-2011, 01:12 PM   #1  
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Default altering a cabinet with paper question

I have a cabinet with cubby holes I want to cover with tim holtz paper. Right now it has a semi gloss paint on it. Do I need to sand it before I try adhere the paper? And is Mod Podge ok to use to adhere?
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Old 07-03-2011, 09:15 PM   #2  
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I don't know if you need to sand. I have just been covering some wood frames that I first covered with acrylic paint. I experienced a little "bubbling" and wrinkling the first time by trying to attach the paper with double stick tape then Mod Podge over top.
Second try, I put a thin layer of Mod Podge on frame service first, a little at a time, smoothing as I went. Then immediately put a coat of Mod Podge over top. That resulted in a much less bubbling but still had one or two spots.

So....I think Mod Podge will work, but you will want to put some on the service you are covering first, and maybe on the back of the paper too before covering. I didn't try that because it seemed like it would make the paper harder to handle and just more messy.

Sanding first probably wouldn't HURT....but you would want to be sure to leave the surface smooth and remove all dust with a damp paper towel before covering.
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Old 07-04-2011, 06:02 AM   #3  
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I would recommend sanding it if it's glossy, you could also try painting a layer of gesso over top, it acts like a primer. You want to be sure to give the paper something to hold on to and slick surfaces can cause you problems sometimes. I'd then use Mod Podge, putting on the surface of the item, the back of the paper, and then also the front of the paper to seal it all.
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Old 07-04-2011, 12:15 PM   #4  
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umm...just read my response...that should say "frame SURFACE"...geez. that's what I get for staying up late! :-0
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:57 PM   #5  
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I found this on Google

I guess the main thing to be concerned about is applying the paper cut outs or whatever and then a few months or years down the road it all pops up!


A finished piece of furniture more than likely has a finish that will repel things on top of it. Normally, that's a good thing--like when you spill that glass of milk, it will bead up and not soak in and stain the wood. The coating makes the wood less porous, as it has sealed the pores of the wood. But if you want to add something else on top of a finished surface that you WANT to stick, it might not.


There are ways around this. You can, of course, strip the wood in the area you will be decoupaging.

Or, you can sand down the area a bit--get rid of the shine, especially, to provide "tooth" to the surface so that other things will grab hold.

You can apply a clear sealer to the surface, such as Jo Sonja's All Purpose Sealer or Decoart's Multi-Purpose Sealer, both available at your local craft stores. Those products seal off the old surface, and also provide a bit of tooth to the new surface so that your new items will adhere better.
Raw wood is the best, but you can work around it.
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Old 07-04-2011, 06:02 PM   #6  
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Decoupage on Wood

Here's more info. It sounds like you will have more success if you sand the finish first.
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