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Old 05-29-2004, 10:25 AM   #1  
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Default Wheels

I am about ready to sell all of my SU stuff and find another hobby all because of my extreme frustration with trying to master wheels. I just ruined five sheets of card stock and about an equal amount of scrap paper with the swirl wheel. I have only been stamping for 1 1/2 years (not a demo; just a good customer!), and in all that time I have managed to pretty much avoid wheels. But I decided to spend some time over this 4 day weekend trying to figure them out. BIG SCREAM!!! If anyone has any tips or hints to offer that would help, I would be grateful.

Thanks,
Cathy
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Old 05-29-2004, 10:33 AM   #2  
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Cathy - I sometimes have trouble getting straight lines with the wheel too.
However, I found pulling the wheel towards you lets you see what you are doing better. Also, going on an angle on the paper makes it not as noticable if you are not perfect. Sandy
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Old 05-29-2004, 10:47 AM   #3  
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I stand up. I can get the line straight and I use my cutter as a straight edge. Good luck and keep practicing.
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Old 05-29-2004, 11:12 AM   #4  
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Thank you so much for your great suggestions, which I will try as soon as I can make myself go back to this. However, my main problem is not so much with getting the line straight as it is with the fact that I can roll two or three perfect lines and then the next one has an incomplete image or an extra line of ink on the edge for some reason. Has anyone else had these problems? Am I just "wheel-challenged"?

ARRGGHH!!
Cathy
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Old 05-29-2004, 11:13 AM   #5  
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Default Wheels

Dear Cathy:

When using the wheel, grip the handle and let your index finger rest along the handle, pointing straight ahead. That seems to help guide the wheel straighter. Also, lay your cardstock on a large sheet of scrap paper and start rolling the wheel while you are on the scrap paper and continue rolling until you are off the cardstock. That seems to give a better print. I sometimes cut my cardstock into quarters and find it is easier to roll the wheel on a smaller sheet of paper.

JoanK
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Old 05-29-2004, 12:37 PM   #6  
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I had the same trouble the other night with the big wheel and thought I was going to lose one of my best customers! We tried standing up, pressing hard, and all kinds of things but some of the images kept appearing not inked. It "seemed" to work when we rolled fast (we tended to be real slow and careful) but I am not sure if that is even the trick. If anyone has a tip on how to get solid images using wheels, I would really appreciate it too!
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Old 05-29-2004, 12:39 PM   #7  
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Default wheels

Another trick I recently learned was to go slowly...helps you stay in line and the index finger held out on the wheel's handle head is an excellent tip too. The tip of using 1/4 pieces of cardstock is an important one too.
Keep with it!
Carol
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Old 05-29-2004, 01:06 PM   #8  
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Okay, I am a very loyal Stampin Up customer and hobby demonstrator. With that said, I have had all of the problems that have been mentioned above. My most frustrating challenge is the same one regarding solid images, specifically Great Outdoors and Zoom. Here's what REALLY works...I use my classic ink pads instead of the ink cartridges. It works like a charm. I know it isn't effective for long areas, like tissue paper, but it works great for cards, and gift bags, or across the corner of a scrapbook page. It makes a very bold and vivid image! Anyone else tried this? Good Luck!!
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Old 05-29-2004, 02:10 PM   #9  
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I think the wheels lose their ink easily, which could be why the ink pads work better for some of you! I am purchasing a cartridge ink refill every so often and have had to refill several of my ink cartridges, even though I purchased them recently. Especially for the solid wheels, this seems to be helping!
HTH! (Hope this helps!)
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Old 05-29-2004, 02:12 PM   #10  
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When I demo the wheel, I tell people it helps to keep their wrists flat. Think of pushing the wheel forward, rather than pushing the wheel down onto the paper. I know the temptation is to push hard (down), but that is what causes the wheel to wobble and you get incomplete images as a result.

Another tip I read was to reink your cartridges each time before you use them. This helps make a nice strong image. Personally haven't tried it, but wanted to pass it along.
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Old 05-29-2004, 02:29 PM   #11  
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I've read about people doing this, but never tried it myself. They hate how their stamping had turned out, having the same problems. So, to solve it, they took the stamp off the wheel and mounted it on a block of wood, making it just like any other stamp.

Course, that wouldn't be a good idea if you were a demo, but may help you otherwise.

Just a thought.
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Old 05-29-2004, 03:23 PM   #12  
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I agree with several others who say that using a stamp pad rather than the inker cartridge produces more consistent results. My aggrevation with the wheels is the "shadow edge" on some of them....I've gone in with an x-acto knife and cut rubber off the edges to eliminate the problem. I think the inherent problem with the wheels is that they have no foam under the rubber to allow for "bounce" - any decrease in pressure while wheeling results in a lighter image.
For those having difficulty keeping a straight line (or getting the rolled image right on the edge of a piece of CS), try using a clear acrylic ruler (the kind quilter's use - they are about 1/8" thick)...the wheel rides nicely against the ruler edge and you can see the CS thru the ruler and you can tell if you are properly aligned.
Wheel challenged in Oregon,
Susy
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Old 05-29-2004, 03:41 PM   #13  
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Default Wheels, their care and training

Even the most experienced demonstrator can flub up with a wheel. I never touched a wheel before I became a demonstrator last year, but now they are one of my favorite tools. Here are my tips.

First, practice on a piece of scrap paper to get a feel for that particular wheel and how easy it rocks.

Some wheels rock easier than others, particularly to the new Hot to Dot Wheel and the Swirl Fun...I've got that one and it's the one you had trouble with. When you rock, you get an edge, just like on a rubber stamp, as well as incomplete images. On those particular wheels there are spaces between the raised parts of the rubber that make it easier to rock, so you have to be extra careful with them. Other wheels that seem almost solid rubber with just a few spaces can be rolled fast, but with these to prevent rocking you have to go slowly.

With wheels that rock easily, I put my left hand on top of my right (assuming you are rolling right handed) to steady the wheel and keep it from rocking. Stand up when you wheel, it's easier to see what you are doing.

Wheels with bolder images have the same problem as any solid stamp; they have a skin that can be removed by rubbing a pencil eraser over it or lightly sanding. That will help the wheel take the ink better.

I like to roll forward. When you roll forward, look where you are rolling rather than at the wheel. It's just like a bicycle, if you look somewhere you tend to steer towards it if you aren't careful. So follow the line you want to make with your eyes and your hands will follow your eyes. I happen to think that rolling forward allows you to keep a more even pressure on the wheel, whereas when you pull towards you you tend to lift slightly as it approaches you.

Once you get one line of stamping down, you can line the edge of the handle up against that line (looking at it from above) and follow it to mirror exactly what you did before. I've also watched the edge of the wheel as I roll if I'm following the edge of the cardstock. If I want to butt the next line of images up against that line, I do the same thing: watch the edge of the wheel to keep it straight.

Another thing to make sure of is when you push the trigger of the ink cartridge towards the wheel that it rests flat on the wheel. Sometimes it will be crooked and that will give you uneven inking.

Ink cartridges dry out faster than ink pads, but if you keep them in a sealed container they will not dry out as fast. Ideally, individual ziplock bags for each cartridge would be perfect, the smallest size that they will fit in. When you reink, sometimes you miss spots and you'll see that when you roll it again on a piece of scrap paper before you use your cardstock. Just add more ink where you think you missed and try again until you get a perfect inking.
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Old 05-29-2004, 03:43 PM   #14  
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Wow! Thank you so much for all the great suggestions. I will try them tomorrow - definitely need to wait for a new day! The MOST helpful information of all is knowing that it is not just me. It helps to know that others are having the same problems. So nice to be able to tap the brains of other stampers!

Thanks,
Cathy
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Old 05-29-2004, 05:44 PM   #15  
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If your right handed start on the left, and if left handed start on the right, then you cn use the previous roll os a guide, and your not trying to look over the wheel to see if your even close!

Kathie
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Old 05-29-2004, 05:58 PM   #16  
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Default wheels!

I've had all of the same problems!!! My upline taught me to use two fingers on top of the wheel (your middle and fore finger) when wheeling.

Kathie- great advice on the left/right handed thing... I'm left handed and always start my wheel on the left hand side of the paper and am always bending over to see where I've wheeled- one would've thought I would just start on the opposite side!!! Go figure!!!

Thanks!
Jen
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Old 05-30-2004, 10:41 AM   #17  
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Something that works great for me is to use my catalog like a ruler and hold it firmly with one hand and the wheel with the other. It makes a great straight line and it isn't as flat as a ruler so there is no danger of running over it. Also, if you are covering an entire card front, start at the bottom and work your way up the page. Just move your catalog (or straight edge) up each time you finish a line. One more tip, sometime if you wheel on a diagonal, it doesn't show the gaps or mistakes as easily.
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Old 06-02-2004, 07:04 PM   #18  
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When you screw up with the wheel (which we all seem to do every now and then) consider the following technique demo'd at convention a few years ago to "save" your C/S.

Wheel in all four directions Vertical, Horizontal, and both diagonals. It makes an unusual background and most of the time you can't even tell what the original wheel design was. Might not be your favorite technique, but it sometimes beats throwing C/S away.

I keep my wheel cartridges in an empty stamp case. Probably not the most air tight but better than nothing and quite portable.
I also reink them OFTEN - especially the red. That one seems to get lighter the fastest for some reason.
I recommend that my customer purchase the reinkers at the same time that they purchase the cartridge. I sure do.

I also recommend the Double line stitched plaid wheel for beginner wheelers. It seems to be the one least likely to give a beginner trouble with rocking. Some wheels are indeed easier than others to use and I too am guilty of taking the exacto blade to the edges of a few.
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Old 06-02-2004, 07:24 PM   #19  
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Default wheel problem

I have found with using the wheels, that you need a very firm table to use. I have to use either my kitchen countertop or my dining room table. If I use a fold up table then I get spaces missing. I also never try to get a straight line...always go diagonally myself since I know I will always mess it up!

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