Misting with Alcohol Markers

by Gina Krupsky

Use your alcohol based markers directly on your stamps.

Supplies

  • Alcohol-based markers, here Copics

  • Stamp

  • Misting bottle with rubbing alcohol

  • Card stock

Step-by-Step

  1. Step 1

    Use alcohol markers directly on the solid rubber stamp.

    Copic Marker RV29 was used for the flower head.

  2. Step 2

    Continue to add color directly to the stamp.

    Copic Marker G85 was used for the stem.

  3. Step 3

    Spray a light mist of rubbing alcohol over the colored image.

  4. Step 4

    Stamp image on cardstock and finish the card.

Video!

Your Turn

You've seen the tutorial, now you try it! We've got a section of the gallery set aside for Misting with Alcohol Markers. Try this technique, then upload your artwork to the gallery. Show us your creations!

Questions and Comments

We'd love to get your feedback or questions. Leave your comment below.

This is a wonderful idea, but will the alcohol inks damage the stamps. I have always heard that alcohol will dry out the stamp.

Linda Duensing
Linda Duensing  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 4:45 AM
I admit, I too am worried about my rubber drying out so I haven't tried this yet. And do the markers permanently colour the rubbers stamps?
Rosie  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 7:20 AM
I've been doing this technique for many months using this same exact stamp. The stamp is as good as new. Even Marianne from Copic marker said that she's done this same thing with no problems. The ink will act like Stazon, so if you use a cleaner like UltraClean, they will clean up like new. smile Keep in mind that inks like Stazon is also a solvent based ink and some people think solvent based-non water based inks are hard on your stamps as well, but proper cleaning and conditioning of your stamps will keep them around for a very long time! smile
Gina K.  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 7:50 AM
I have a quick question too ~ is your rubbing alcohol in a glass spray bottle and do you know where I can get one? I believe in the past I attempted to use an alcohol-based liquid in a plastic bottle and it evaporated or ... something?.... it was a long time ago!! But I remember being told that perfumes and alcohol-based liquids need to be in a glass spray bottle but I've never been able to find one. THANKS!
Nancy  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:00 AM
Just a few more facts for those who are concerned:
Some of the main ingredients in Solvent based inks are 2-butoxyethyl acetate, cyclohexanone and n-butyl acetate. These solvents are actually much more harsh than rubbing alcohol that you use in your medicine cabinet at home.

Material Safety Data Sheets suggests that you should be careful to not get these products on your skin, however, rubbing alcohol is a recommened antiseptic for skin and used routinely in hospitals and doctor's offices.

My thought is that if I am using a product like a solvent based ink such as Stazon on my rubber stamps with no worries, an ocassion mist of alcohol is no big deal. Just my humble opinion.

Happy Stamping!
Gina K.  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:02 AM
Nancy,
In the past I have used an empty Stampin' Mist bottle for mine. In the picture, I am using the Mini Misters by Ranger. I have not had any evaporation that I can see. HTH!
Gina K.
Gina K.  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:04 AM
Oh, lovely card! I also wondered over the stamps so thanks a lot for all facts!
Chruss  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:04 AM
Thank you so much for the quick reply!! I have an extra Stampin' Mist bottle so I'm all set!

And by the way, just a quick testimonial for UltraClean which I purchase from Gina K. My stamps are as clean as they can be ~ it's a wonderful product smile
Nancy  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:06 AM
I was wondering...where can you find a misting bottle????? Ack!
I absolutely love this card!
Can't wait to try this our with my copics!
TFS
Tracee619  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:25 AM
You can find Misting bottles in the "travel size" section of Target, Wal-Mart, etc. They're designed for hairspray, so they really do send out a fine mist...and not very expensive!
Arlene  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:38 AM
Please is there the equivalent of rubbing alcohol over here in the U.K?
Kaye  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:44 AM
Thanks for the advice Gina! I shall try that technique tonight...

Kaye - you can buy Isopropyl alcohol from your Pharmacist - if you explain what you want it for. 600ml bottles cost about £5.00+
Rosie  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 8:50 AM
It is a very pretty card, but I think I am missing the point - what effect is there from alcohol- based markers that you can't get from more typical ones (like my SU ones)? I've never tried copic markers.

Thanks, Jackie
Jackie H  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 9:23 AM
Surgical sprit is the same as rubbing alcohol and readily available in Boots and other chemists.
Sticky stuff remover will clean alcohol based marker or ink (like stazon) from your stamps (you can get in at Lakeland.
Love all these new techniques - many thanks. Janet
janet chard  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 9:42 AM
I am by no means "smashing" this technique but I agree with Jackie H. I have never used copic markers and I'm still learning LOTS about stamping. If there is controversy over damage to stamps and alcohol concerns why not just use typical markers??
Melinda O  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 9:44 AM
My daughters LOVE the Bath & Body Works body sprays. As they near the end of one I hound them to save them for me! I didn't know what I was saving them for (one's got water in it) but they are free, the sample sized bottles are so convenient, and the sprays are alcohol-based to begin with. They should be perfect! Now where are my markers??
Robin  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 10:19 AM
Thank you for the tutorial it was so cute, I'll try it.
ELIZABETH C.  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 10:24 AM
I use rubbing alcohol to clean stamps that are really dirty. Works great, rinse with water when finished. A toothbrush and bar soap works well to clean intricate stamps. My stamps will outlive me.
stampmason  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 10:44 AM
70% alcohol is the kind to use.

To address the question, "What's the difference?"

There really isn't much of a difference, it's just a bit more vibrant.

For those who may have more a limited budget and have to decide between waterbased markers and alcohol markers, it's nice to know that there are additional techniques that can be performed with alcohol markers.

It's always fun to have a product at home that you thought was limited to one type of use and then find out that you can do a lot more with it!

wink
Gina K.  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 10:44 AM
I never did this, but sure am going to try,
Thank you so much.
Martha.
Martha  |  Wed Jul 30, 2008 at 11:36 AM

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