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Old 08-07-2010, 10:50 AM   #1
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Default Pigment Ink/Dye Ink

Hello, I am rather new to this and my question is, what exactly IS the difference between the two types of ink? I can't find any useful info when "googling" the question and was hoping for some help here. Thanks!
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Old 08-07-2010, 10:57 AM   #2
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Dye ink is fast drying ink, whereas pigment ink is a made differently and is thicker than regular dye ink. You use pigment ink to emboss with embossing powder. Both can be used for stamping, you will just need to wait for the pigment ink to dry or use a heat tool to speed up the process.
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:25 PM   #3
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Thanks, Nancy, that does help. I have also heard that one is more colorfast than the other? I am not sure which or if that is even a correct statement.
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:52 PM   #4
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More pigment inks are considered archival because they do not fade over time. Where as many dye based inks are water based and tend to fade over time. There are of course exceptions to this in each category. The packaging of the ink will generally tell you whether the product is archival and acid free.
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Old 08-07-2010, 07:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by candyly View Post
Hello, I am rather new to this and my question is, what exactly IS the difference between the two types of ink? I can't find any useful info when "googling" the question and was hoping for some help here. Thanks!
Dye inks are pigment rich, water-based and either subject to fading or are permanent (heat setting is usually required), and dry quickly on most surfaces.

Pigment inks contain glycol (a glycerin product), are water-based, thicker in viscosity than dye inks, dry slowly (often do not dry on non-porous surfaces), tend not to fade, and are often used with embossing powder for thermal embossing.

Embossing ink is thick and intended primarily for thermal embossing (with embossing powder) and is either clear or lightly tinted.

Either pigment or embossing ink can be blended with a dye ink to allow for thermal embossing.

Hybrid inks are water-based, permanent (often do not require heat setting), dry quickly, are not as thick in viscosity as a pigment ink, and rarely can be thermal embossed (unless blended with a pigment or embossing ink).

Solvent-based inks cannot be thermal embossed, are permanent when dry, often are not recommended for use on fabric; usually are permanent on non-posous surfaces, and require care when using due to the solvents included in the ink.

The sites of ink companies usually have a chart listing the types of ink they produce and the best uses for those inks. Ink companies usually provide recommended uses and substrates on the packaging of each pad.

One tip...always buy the reinker when purchasing a pad. Those little bottles are as handy as can be; reinking the pad is only one of the many ways that ink can be used.

Last edited by craftdesigns; 08-07-2010 at 07:43 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 08-21-2010, 11:49 AM   #6
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oh, am I glad I found this info!

Thank You a millions times!!!

I've copied & pasted it to a word doc to keep in my scraproom or take with me shopping.
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