In the Forums

Register

Today's Posts

Search


Get the Weekly
Inkling
newsletter





Previous Issues

Get Social

Like Splitcoaststampers on Facebook Follow Splitcoaststampers on Twitter Watch Splitcoaststampers Videos on YouTube

Sponsored Ads


 
Splitcoaststampers.com - the world's #1 papercrafting community
You're currently viewing Splitcoaststampers as a GUEST. We pride ourselves on being great hosts, but guests have limited access to some of our incredible artwork, our lively forums and other super cool features of the site! You can join our incredible papercrafting community at NO COST. So what are you waiting for?

Join the party at Splitcoaststampers today!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-01-2010, 03:24 PM   #1
Die Cut Diva
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,560
Default Answers to which die cutting machine is better

Frequently people new to die cutting machines ask " Which machine is better" The vast number of die cutting machines available can be overwhelming for a person who knows nothing about them.
I will try to provide a road map "

The simple answer is die cutting machines are like cameras. It depends on what you want to do with it and how much money you are prepared to spend.

People can only tell another person which machine they use and why they like it . Your needs may be different from theirs

There are sticky threads at the top of this section to explain the different features and quirks of various machines . Nothing in life is perfect for every situation

Manual machines work like a pasta roller. You put a die or embossing folder between cutting plates to achieve that result . Each machine uses a different configuration of plates called a sandwich. The sandwich arrangements for each machine are listed in the sticky for that brand of machine.

Electrically powered pasta roller style machines work the same as the hand cranked machines except you don't hand crank them you plug them in and the powered is provided by electricity

Cuttlebug, Bigshot/Bigkick ( same machine just have a different design) are examples of pasta roller type machine . Wizard by Spellbinders is also a pasta roller system, but it has a ratchet rather than a crank handle

To my knowledge the only machines that will accept embossing folders or texture plates are pasta roller style.



Electronic die cutting machine are programmed like a computer. Some use your computer to access the shapes and you buy software for that while others use cartridges and you buy the cartridges that have the shapes you want . There are numerous electric die cutting machines on the market all with different features and sizes of paper they will cut . These also have a sticky at the top of this section to explain the pros and cons of each machine

Anyone trying to decide which machine they will buy needs to ask themselves what will they do with it? This will narrow down your choices.

What do you plan to make? Cards, scrapbooks, banners for school, etc. Scrapbook pages and banners may need a machine that will cut larger paper or dies

How many items will you need to cut? Multiples for school projects or Sunday school? You may want an electrically powered pasta roller machine or an electronic one if you will be cutting alot of die shapes

Do you have a health issue such as arthritis or carpal tunnel. A hand crank machine may cause you pain. You may need at least an electrically powered machine.

What brand of die do you want to use?. Spellbinder ( and others like them) and Cuttlebug dies are thin. Sizzix dies like the ones sold by Stampin Up are thick and the Bigshot ( preferably) or Cuttlebug is needed to cut them. The Bigshot has an opening a tad wider than the Cuttlebug to accommodate the dies.

How much space for storage do you have ? Do you plan to take your machine to crops or classes?
The Cuttlebug is more portable because the platform folds up. The Bigshot is a tad sturdier but doesn't fold up.

Are you comfortable using your computer? Electronic machines are programmed on the machines such as the Cricut or actually from your computer if you access the shapes via software.

How much do you want to spend on a machine and dies or shapes?


The initial investment in a machine is less with a pasta roller style ( $50-$80+) , but the cutting dies and embossing folders are not cheap

The cost of an electronic machine is more, but if you must buy cartridges or software for the shapes and those can add up.
Replacement mats are needed for all machines . You cut into them and they get scratched and worn. Cutting blades need to be replaced on electronic machines

It takes considerable research to buy the "right machine" for YOU
What ever you choose to buy make it a machine you will really use and enjoy
Check out the sticky threads here for various machines and also Google them for more information.

There are a gazillion YouTube video on how to use each machine.

I hope this helps
Barbara

Last edited by Barbara Jay; 12-01-2010 at 03:45 PM..
Barbara Jay is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 07:33 PM   #2
Embossing Fanatic
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Hudson Valley of NY
Posts: 331
Send a message via AIM to tyger
Default

Thanks for this comparison. I know that each person's needs are different. I do have one question. What is the geneology of the first to the nost current cricut? I have seen so many names around it boggles my mind. The oldest one is a personal cutter, correct? that was on sale over Black Fri for $70. Is the newest the Expression that sells for $400 (not on sale)? Which are inbetween.
tyger is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 08:01 PM   #3
Crimping Master
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Washington state
Posts: 1,192
Default

As far as I know, here's the "geneology" of the Cricuts:

Personal = Baby Bug = Original Cricut (Cuts 12 sizes between 1" - 5 1/2". Uses 6x12 mats)

Cricut Expression = "E" (Cuts 1/2" - 11 1/2" I think. Uses 12x12 or 12x24 mats)

Cricut Imagine prints and cuts. Same size as Expression.

Cricut Create is sized like the Bug, but has more functionalities like Expression.

OK, that's all I know.

P.S. and then there are the Cricut Cake machines, which I still think are just crazy!
__________________
Annie
My Blog / Website / Facebook Page / Gallery
lovemycards is online now  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2010, 05:44 AM   #4
Pearl-ExPert
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,013
Default

Cricut Expression can cut as small as 1/4 inch and up to 11.5 inches if using the 12x12 inch mat. If using the 12x24 inch mat it cuts 1/4 inch up to 23.5 inches.

Bare in mind that many of the images on the newer cartridges now are very intricate and won't cut in the smaller sizes. You just have to try for yourself to see how small they will cut based on the paper you are using and how sticky your mat is and the age of your blade. All these things are factors in how well your cuts will be.

Patti
pjw2855 is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2010, 08:38 AM   #5
Rubber Obsessor
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 153
Default

To add to the discussion of electronic cutters. There are machines that are more expensive than the Cricut that do not require cartridges or additional outlay for software. Machines such as the Pazzles and Klic-N-Kut operate with just the machine and the software that comes with it. You do need to be connected to the computer, so in that term they are not "portable". With these machines you can cut most any shape or image you can find. For example, I can scan my hand a cut an image of it. I can import a pdf, jpeg or other image file I find on the internet and make a cut as well as resize it. I can design my own cut file.

With the MTC and SCAL software, the Cricut machines act pretty much in this same fashion.
duffercat is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2010, 12:20 PM   #6
Die Cut Diva
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,560
Default

Just for reference SCAL is a soft ware you buy to convert graphics you find on the net or have.
SCAL is the acronym for " Sure Cuts A Lot"

MTC is the same idea and it is the Acronym for "Make The Cut"
Both work on a PC , but I believe only One of works on a Mac and I think it is SCAL. If you use a MAC and buy one of these be sure the software will work on it

Both of these save a lot of money because you don't need to spend a fortune on cartridges.
Barbara Jay is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2010, 08:53 PM   #7
Polyshrink Goddess
 
stampindamour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 566
Default

Thanks for the info! My Big-Shot is still in the package from last Christmas. I plan to try some new dies in it...very soon!

-pamela
stampindamour is offline  
Tweet this Post! Share on Facebook Reddit!! Pin on Pinterest! Share on Google+!
Reply With Quote
Reply





Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off