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Old 01-29-2007, 02:41 PM   #521
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okiechic
Thanks, Dorinda. I worry about stories like that too. My kids have a lot of interventions, but I definitely think their is such thing as too much. I also think at some point you have to accept your child. That doesn't mean you don't continue to try to help them succeed. It just means you stop treating them like they're broken.

I was hoping it would be more about what autism looks like, and how to know if your child may have it. There seems to be so little that is public knowledge.

Okay, stepping down from my soap box...
there was some of that also, I guess I am trained that Autism has no cure, you don't come out of it...yes there are a million levels of ASD from low to high and everywhere in between, so some kids may be a lot higher or lower functioning than others...they do make progress over time, they also can regress with progress if it is not consistant and on going.
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Old 01-29-2007, 03:00 PM   #522
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Yeah, I remember Caleb's ped telling us early on - "It's a marathon not a sprint."
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Old 01-29-2007, 04:16 PM   #523
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Originally Posted by Dorinda
It wasn't bad, good actually they had kids and parents on and Temple Grandin.
The only thing that bothered me was presenting that kids can 'overcome' or 'recover' from Autism....I was afraid I guess that parents will be given false hopes that there will be or could be a magic fix for autism and it will just go away...we all know it doesn't.
It takes a lot of therapy and consistancy with ASD kiddo's, and believe it or not all families do not have access or means to provide 40 hrs of ABA a week every week plus OT and speech, this one family really took a total hands on approach and was all therapy all the time...this is the claim that their child recovered from autism
I agree with you. The show was good - especially Temple Grandin. But I also don't appreciate parents saying they have cured their child. I know we all work as hard as we can with our children and I think that these parents saying with hard work you can cure your child will make some parents feel like failures. I just hope everyone watching took it with a grain of salt knowing that all kids are on different levels of the spectrum and there is no real cure - just progress and improvement. I would love to 'cure' my son, but he's wonderful just the way he is with all his quirks.
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Old 01-29-2007, 04:40 PM   #524
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or those who are "watching" us think we are not trying hard enough or our child would be cured.
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Old 01-29-2007, 05:05 PM   #525
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I agree with you. The show was good - especially Temple Grandin. But I also don't appreciate parents saying they have cured their child. I know we all work as hard as we can with our children and I think that these parents saying with hard work you can cure your child will make some parents feel like failures. I just hope everyone watching took it with a grain of salt knowing that all kids are on different levels of the spectrum and there is no real cure - just progress and improvement. I would love to 'cure' my son, but he's wonderful just the way he is with all his quirks.
exactly! Very well said
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Old 01-30-2007, 04:42 AM   #526
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or those who are "watching" us think we are not trying hard enough or our child would be cured.
Or even my own guilt for not doing enough to help my child.

When my son was getting early intervention, I always felt so, so guilty for not being able to do the 40 hours per week of therapy. I fought for services and was lucky to get 15 hours! Then thought I should find some people to help me, but honestly, I just couldn't do it. Plus my son still napped and would fall asleep in therapy in the afternoon so we gave up on that.

I find that I am always thinking I should be doing more. Because there is no one cure or "magic bullet", we all have to find what works for our children and our families.

I have to say I started crying when Toni Braxton started crying in the beginning when she was talking about her son being diagnosed. It's so raw. I'm glad she wants to speak out and help others.

Thanks for letting me share my feelings.
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Old 01-30-2007, 04:52 AM   #527
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For me, the guilt is the hardest part. No matter how much I do, it never feels like enough. Others have suggested that I need to "accept" his condition and curb my endless searching for answers, for help, for that one strategy that will make a difference. As much as I know this is true, I am having a real hard time with the acceptance part. I want him to know that he's wonderful just the way he is, and yet I also want him to know that I will go to the ends of the Earth to make things easier for him. Kind of a contradiction, huh?
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Old 01-30-2007, 05:22 AM   #528
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I want him to know that he's wonderful just the way he is, and yet I also want him to know that I will go to the ends of the Earth to make things easier for him. Kind of a contradiction, huh?
Not a contradiction at all. I think this is just parenthood in general.
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Old 01-30-2007, 05:27 AM   #529
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Not a contradiction at all. I think this is just parenthood in general.
I agree
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Old 01-30-2007, 07:48 AM   #530
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beadfreak22
For me, the guilt is the hardest part. No matter how much I do, it never feels like enough. Others have suggested that I need to "accept" his condition and curb my endless searching for answers, for help, for that one strategy that will make a difference. As much as I know this is true, I am having a real hard time with the acceptance part. I want him to know that he's wonderful just the way he is, and yet I also want him to know that I will go to the ends of the Earth to make things easier for him. Kind of a contradiction, huh?
I agree that is just part of parenting but I know how it tears at your heart. You want to do everything you can but we have limits. Another thing I struggle with is our DS with AS is our only adopted (in family). People judge me of being more strict on him because of that and not because of his AS. I hate people thinking they know how to "parent " my child better than I. That they know what is best and how he would react more than I. Why haven't I tried A or B and have I spoke with this person or read that book... (sorry, it's been a trying week, off soapbox...)
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Old 01-30-2007, 08:34 AM   #531
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Both of my kids are adopted as well and it is my oldest that is diagnosed with Aspergers. It is really hard for me not to take offense when people ask me if he was a drug baby or something. Why do people ask that? What does it matter to them whether he was or not? I thought the biggest issue we would have to deal with is explaining our multi cultural family. That may be a big issue in the future. But, for now, our focus is on getting Caleb all the help he can get. He's making great progress and our school district has been excellent about providing services for us through preschool and at home.
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Old 01-31-2007, 07:03 AM   #532
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Is anyone's child middle school age. My son will be starting middle school next year and I'm really concerned about putting him in school. Although, he looks perfectly normal he is still very young mentaly and socially. So far we have been very blessed and he has been very loved and well accepted by the children in his school. But Jr high and highschool is a whole nother ball game. He has learned to read and reads much better then most kids his age but he is still way behind his age group. I just don't know if it is worth it to put him in Jr high. I am also very concerned about how he will be treated and even concerned for his safety. I'm seriouly considering keeping him home and homeschooling and maybe looking for an ABA therapist. I know that the one he had back in Colorado would take the kiddos she worked with on outings to give thme oportunities to socialize and gain social skills. That's the one thing I would worry about him missing out on if I kept him out of school. Any thoughts or ideas would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-01-2007, 11:10 AM   #533
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TIA
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Old 02-01-2007, 11:26 AM   #534
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I'm sure someone will have an answer for you soon.

My DS is only 5 and I've Homeschooled for 13 years now (die hard!). I do not start boys in K until they are 6 so it is not an issue yet for me. I have learned that in order to teach my DS anthing I have to teach his sister and let him listen. He is very smart but cannot be taught face to face. He starts laughing histerically until he about falls over. If I teach his sister who is 11 month younger he memorizes it all. He has memorized chapters of the Bible just by listening to me teach his older brothers. So that is how we will do K next fall.

If you do decide to HS there are alot of great support groups who get together often for outings etc. Ours has field trips, extra curricular classes and Gym once a month. We even have a group newspaper.
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Old 02-01-2007, 12:02 PM   #535
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Thank you for your response. That is so interesting about your son! I've never heard of anything like that. These kiddos are fascinating. I'm going to try to do a bit of research online to see what I can learn about the provinces we think we may end up in. I sure wish we could return to the states, but oh well.

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I'm sure someone will have an answer for you soon.

My DS is only 5 and I've Homeschooled for 13 years now (die hard!). I do not start boys in K until they are 6 so it is not an issue yet for me. I have learned that in order to teach my DS anthing I have to teach his sister and let him listen. He is very smart but cannot be taught face to face. He starts laughing histerically until he about falls over. If I teach his sister who is 11 month younger he memorizes it all. He has memorized chapters of the Bible just by listening to me teach his older brothers. So that is how we will do K next fall.

If you do decide to HS there are alot of great support groups who get together often for outings etc. Ours has field trips, extra curricular classes and Gym once a month. We even have a group newspaper.
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Old 02-01-2007, 01:22 PM   #536
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mustardseed,
Even though my son is only 5 and going to K, I feel like I have the same problem in some respects. He's very bright, but his language and social skills are lagging.

Would the school district provide an aide for your son to follow him from class to class and to ensure his safety? I am sure you aren't the only one with a special needs child and there may be other children in need of this kind of aide so the aide could be shared with 2-3 kids. KWIM?

It's encouraging to hear that there are other children who are accepting of your son. Do they play with him outside of school too?

Could you do 3 days/week at school and 2 days at home or some sort of arrangement like that?

I totally am in awe of people who home school because I know I could never do it. My patience level is about a zero! And I know that my son is so much more verbal and more attentive with his teachers than with me.

I'm sorry I don't have any answers!
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Old 02-01-2007, 04:08 PM   #537
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Hi there,

Well, I know that in the states it's the law that they have to provide an aide but here in Canada I'm not sure. I'm going to have to do lots of research. I really don't know if it would even be worth it for him to attend middle school though. The just going a couple of days a week is a thought.

Yes, the children at the schools he's attended have always been very sweet and accepting of him. All of the kids in the school always greet him very warmly and look out for him. I'm nto sure about the past 3 years because unfortunately I've been separated from him. His father had an affair and left me and I am remarried and living in Quebec. But when I was still with him in Colorado he had different friends outside of school, from church. Their mothers were my friends.

Quote:
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mustardseed,
Even though my son is only 5 and going to K, I feel like I have the same problem in some respects. He's very bright, but his language and social skills are lagging.

Would the school district provide an aide for your son to follow him from class to class and to ensure his safety? I am sure you aren't the only one with a special needs child and there may be other children in need of this kind of aide so the aide could be shared with 2-3 kids. KWIM?

It's encouraging to hear that there are other children who are accepting of your son. Do they play with him outside of school too?

Could you do 3 days/week at school and 2 days at home or some sort of arrangement like that?

I totally am in awe of people who home school because I know I could never do it. My patience level is about a zero! And I know that my son is so much more verbal and more attentive with his teachers than with me.

I'm sorry I don't have any answers!
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:36 AM   #538
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Hi everyone. My stepson, soon to be 14, was officially diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome just before Thanksgiving. It had been apparent that something was wrong for a very long time. He is an 8th grader, and we worry terribly about him going to high school. He will go to a big public school that is, in some ways, a tough school. He's very brilliant, but like most kids with AS, he is socially a mess and hs NO empathy or sympathy. It has been very difficult. Things seemed to flare up at the end of 7th grade and the first half of 8th grade has been a nightmare. He was put in a psych ward for two weeks, and that's where he was diagnosed. It's been a ROUGH road. Some have said that part of it with AS kids is the hormones at that age. Have any of you found that to play a big role in them seeming to get worse? He is on meds right now, quiet a few.....

I'd like to chat with people who are dealing with a similar AS situation. It's not an easy thing to deal with, but mostly because you can really feel in the dark. I'd love to hear from anyone who wants to "chat" about AS and maybe be some sort of a support system.

Feel free to write me at writeone23 at comcast dot net.

THANKS and all the best...

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Old 02-06-2007, 08:47 AM   #539
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Cindy(cynamom),
I just want to write and give you some cyber support. I have heard that puberty is the worse time for kids on the spectrum and/or with any disorder like ADHD or bipolar or OCD, etc. I have heard of one 13 yr old boy who uses the shower like 6 times a day. I've heard of another who was hospitalized and on meds. I've heard of one girl who has no friends and can barely do her homework because the projects are just too overwhelming even when they are broken down into chunks. I think that time of life is hard enough for typical kids, but to add sensory issues and even more social issues on top of it is really, really hard for kids with special needs.

I'm not sure where you live, but Center for Ooutreach and Services for the Autism Community (www.njcosac.org) in NJ is running a support group for parents with adolescents at Children's Specialized Hospital. Maybe there is something on their website and/or in their publications that would be helpful for you?

I'm sorry I can't be more helpful. Hang in there!!!
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:43 AM   #540
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Catherine,

Thanks for the note and information. I live in the Chicago suburbs. I am going to try to find some sort of a support group that is convenient and deals with Asperger's issues. I think what makes AS so hard for me is that it is like in many ways they have no issues at all on the surface, but the issues they do have can be SO painful to those around him. He's said some of the most hurtful things to us that you can imagine. We have other kids, too, so it gets complicated. The way AS can manifest itself as far as rudeness goes is overwhelming. My biggest worry of all is that he will not be able to function as an adult in society. You can't tell your boss he's a jerk and knows nothing (like he's told us and his teachers), etc. I also wish he could learn to get a handle on the social aspects and devleop some friendships. Right now he seems no point in having friends. He's actually told us that he is not sure what the point of having friends is. It's hard when he sees things in all the wrong ways. One day at a time, right?

Thanks, again...

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Old 02-06-2007, 10:58 AM   #541
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Do any of you have your children in any sports? My 3 older boys are wrestlers and my 5 yr old sits for hours at Saturday's tournaments watching them. My DH was wondering how he might do if he signs him up next year. He is so small for his size I do not even know if there is a weight class that small.
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Old 02-06-2007, 12:09 PM   #542
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My 5 yr old (PDD-NOS) plays soccer. At this age, it doesn't matter what kind of skill you have since all of the kids are just running as a pack out on the field...and even some of the typical kids refuse the play or just look at the butterflies.

I have to laugh though because my son plays like an autistic person. He knows he has to put the ball in the goal and that's it. If that means taking the ball away from his own team or just barrelling through the group or scoring for the other team, he does just that. All he wants to do is score goals and count how many he's made. I think it will get harder for him as the skill level increases and the need to play more as a team is increasingly important.

I have heard that individual sports are good for ASD kids --- like tennis, swimming, gymnastics, fencing---because you are essentially playing by yourself. Swimming is great OT. Fencing is a confined space and good for those with visual spatial problems.

I too would love to hear if others are involved in sports...

And we do have a few "challenger leagues" around here, but I haven't tried them yet.
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Old 02-07-2007, 05:39 AM   #543
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My stepson with AS could not do sports. He sees no need for rules, so when he plays, he plays by HIS rules, like in baseball making his OWN basepath to home plate, via center field if need be! It's funny, but not funny. He also seems to think that he has the right to discuss calls with the ref and umpire. You know, he knows more than they do, etc. Sports isn't for him.... but I would think a more individualized sport might be..... tennis, wrestling, etc. Not sure.

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Old 02-07-2007, 06:24 AM   #544
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My Danny played soccer for a while, and would stand there looking at a blade of grass when the ball was coming straight towards him. He did really well at swimming and tennis, though.
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Old 02-07-2007, 08:17 AM   #545
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I would think that swimming would be a great sport, for sure. Maybe we'll look into that. We have an above-ground pool, and he likes to be in it.

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Old 02-08-2007, 07:58 AM   #546
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WOW...nice to know I'm not the only cyber stamper with an autistic child. Son 7 years old moderately autistic and daughter 6 ADHD....they're a hand full....so I know where you all are coming from....some days you just need a good boost to keep you going!!!!
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Old 02-08-2007, 08:38 AM   #547
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Caleb did Smart Start soccer when he was 3-4. He wouldn't do much there, but would come home and do the little drills in the backyard. He also really liked helping clean up the cones after practice.

We've been thinking about trying other sports. I think Luke,my 3 yo, would make a great wrestler and love every minute of it. Heck, he was wrestling our dog before he could walk. The rules are pretty clear, and they really only have to deal with one other person at a time. It might be worth a try.

Gymnastics will be our next adventure in sports. We got gift certificates to My Gym for Christmas, and they have an autism class here just in case the kids can't tolerate the class with neurotypical peers. I'm pretty sure my little guy will be fine with the NTs, but my older one could go either way.
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Old 02-08-2007, 08:47 AM   #548
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Just wanted to stop in and say hi.

Somehow I lost my email notifications for this thread
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Old 02-08-2007, 09:59 AM   #549
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Laura,
Just wanted to write and say that my kids LOVE LOVE LOVE MyGym. It has a ball pit and they just go nuts for that -- it's such a sensory thing. If yours has classes for ASD kids, go for it.
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Old 02-08-2007, 10:22 AM   #550
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Sounds like it might be the perfect thing for him. He loves to mimic his older brothers and I know he loves them, but just does not get the socializing thing. So he keeps to himself even in our large family. He asks his brother to play with him. His brother sits down by him and starts and shortly after he has moved over and is playing all by himself again. He just does not get the "together". So this might be a way he can be like them and not have to be with them if you KWIM? DH thinks it might give him something to focus on too. He is constantly jumping from one thing to another. We have a 30 minute rule, where he has to do one thing for at least 30 minutes or he would just be running is circles constantly.

Swimming would not work for him as he hates even bathes. When he came to live with us and I would try to bath him. He acted like he was being drowned. His birth father only had one arm that worked. (He lost the use of the other one in a car accident) So we wondered if maybe he had a bad episode in the bath, but now I think it is just a bad fear of water. It is improving slowly.
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Old 02-08-2007, 12:38 PM   #551
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Catherine, Thanks for the input. I'm looking forward to giving it a try.
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Old 02-08-2007, 12:38 PM   #552
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My son was on a challenger baseball team for 4 years before we moved here to Okinawa and he loved it! He wasn't a great baseball player by any means, but he enjoyed running the bases and hitting the ball and the cheering. He would get so excited when everyone would cheer for him when he hit the ball or would actually field one. I think anything that helps with social skills is a plus whether they are good at it or not. My son is also a swimmer - a real fish at heart, so when we head back to the states later this year I hope to find a swim program or team for him. And, maybe baseball again. He was clueless in soccer - would just stand in the field.
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Old 02-09-2007, 07:04 AM   #553
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I just found this thread! My son just turned 13 today and has been in middle school here in Toronto for 2 years now. We came from Victoria, BC (so small town compared to here) and was pretty shocked by middle school. the kids so far have been pretty good (although he is in a special needs class and integrated in French and PE), but I would have preferred to have a K-8 school. My son is very immature, he still likes to watch Blue's Clues and the Wiggles, so I worry about bullying and teasing. Puberty has started for us and so far not too bad, I have heard that the hormones wreak havoc on them so have been keeping an eye out!
Glad to have finally found the thread!
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Old 02-09-2007, 07:15 AM   #554
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Ugh...a little down/angry by the front page news article in today's New Jersey paper saying that NJ has the highest rate of autism in the US and that it's estimated at one in 94 children. I swear it's got to be the environment, but my DH's job is and always will be in NYC so I feel like there's no place else for us to live. What are we doing to our kids!!!???
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Old 02-09-2007, 07:41 AM   #555
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I have been following this thread very carefully, not posting but reading. My cousins grandson has a mild case of autism that they are dealing with as well as possible. He is on a restricted diet and getting pre-school help.

I am very much, in my mindset, of the opinion that all the "stuff" they put in our foods, drugs they put us on for every little thing and shots they must give our kids have a great deal to do with it. I have a new grandson who is 4 months old. I will also be a great grandmother in June so my children are adults. I don't remember hearing of this problem so much when they were children or when I was growing up. I know it was there just not as prevelant. I don't have any solution for the problem but hope they soon find some answers to help our youing ones.

I admire all of you in your dealings with these problems and know it takes a special person to handle. May God bless you all!
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Old 02-09-2007, 02:36 PM   #556
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muffincards
Ugh...a little down/angry by the front page news article in today's New Jersey paper saying that NJ has the highest rate of autism in the US and that it's estimated at one in 94 children. I swear it's got to be the environment, but my DH's job is and always will be in NYC so I feel like there's no place else for us to live. What are we doing to our kids!!!???
Don't be down about the stats for NJ. I used to live in NJ (McGuire AFB) before moving here to Okinawa. I remember hearing of people that would specifically move to NJ from southern states because the services are so much better. NJ has specialized schools like Princeton, Yale and Douglas - plus some of the public schools are consulted by those schools. How many states have resources like COSAC? NJ is a great place to be for an autistic child and a lot of people know it. The article stated states like Alabama with low #'s - have you heard of programs in that state???? Probably not. So, don't let those #'s get you down at all. My son made huge strides while we were in NJ - I loved it there!!
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Old 02-09-2007, 03:49 PM   #557
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Hi Diana,
I know (sigh)....we do live in a good state for services and by coincidence we live in a town known for it's great preschool disabled program. Both my kids get special ed help and I love the special ed teachers and aides. BTW, I used to live in Japan (Tokyo) in the early 1980s because of my dad's job--not army, but IBM (I've Been Moved). I never made it to Okinawa though....
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Old 02-13-2007, 01:19 PM   #558
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Let's share some positive things about having a child with autism and/or some positive accomplishments that your child had no matter how big or small:
http://www.splitcoaststampers.com/fo...27#post4819227
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Old 02-13-2007, 02:03 PM   #559
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Guess I'll jump in here. My daughter is 34 years old and autistic. She was born in Baton Rough, LA. We have also live in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Washington. When she was little she was slow in learning to roll over, walk and talk. We were told by Dr.s that there was nothing wrong with her and she would outgrow it. One even sent my DH and me to a psychiarist because we kept saying there was something wrong with her. Finally after moving to KY. a new Dr. thought there might be a problem. He sent her for some testing and we received a diagnosis of Autism and Mental Retardation. And believe me that is a long way from "she'll outgrow it!"

Shortly after the diagnosis we moved to Nashville, TN. My DH worked for the Federal Government, hence all the moves. We did find a great program there for handicapped pre-schoolers. She was five by this time but we got in. After being there for nearly two years she moved into the public school system. She was in a self contained classroom in a regular school. I found that by being active myself in the schools it made it easier to request things for her and her classmates. When she was nearly 16 we moved to Edmonds, Washington. We were there for over four years. One thing I did learn there is that you need to become your child's guardian when they become 18. Even though they are disabled they are considered adults and can make their own decisions (if some unscrupulous person wants to take advantage of them). So we had to go to court to be legally named her guardian.

We knew the job in WA. was about to end so I started calling lots of different states to find out what sort of services they had for adults. We moved to Lincoln, NE. when she was 20. That gave her nearly two years in the public schools system before trying to find adult services. I do know that you nearly have to be in the school system before you can expect any adult services. She was able to move right from school into an adult program. Lucky for us the state had the money to serve people graduating that year and helped place them all. That was the last year that has happened here.

DD moved into a group home when she was 25. She lives with two other autistic ladies. They all go out during the day, my daughter to a sheltered workshop. They have staff with them at all times when they are at home. It has been one of the best experiences for her and for us. The same three ladies have been together since the house opened and there have been very few changes in staff. That is almost unheard of. Usually the staff come and go like there is a swinging door on the house. But DD house has been a great place to live and for staff to work so they seem to stay.

I am very glad that I checked out states services before we moved. I think if we were still in TN. she would still be on the waiting list for services. I don't think WA. was a lot better. NE. has high taxes but they do take care of the disabled.

I have been called the formidable mother, a proactive mother and probably a lot of other names that I haven't heard. But I do know that you have to be very active in your child's life. Don't wait for things to happen if you really think your child needs them. Make them happen!

My DH has retired now and we will continue to live in NE. because of our daughter's living arrangements. I wouldn't even consider moving her now that she is settled in her own house and working.

There are a lot of good things that can happen in your childs life. They might not be what you dreamed about when you were pregnant with your child but they are still good. I have met some of my very best friends because of my daughter.
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Old 02-14-2007, 06:32 AM   #560
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Hi everyone,
One more to add to your list. I couldn't believe it when I found this thread. You always think you are the only one but now everywhere I look I find more people going through the same thing as we do.

Here is our story. We live in Québec city Canada and we have two sons. Ben will turn 3 next week and Elliott will turn 1 in two weeks. We are on the waiting list to get a proper diagnosis for Ben. It is too early to tell if Elliott has something. We think he is ok but only time will tell. We will be moving to Montreal soon and we are hoping that we will get better services for Ben there since it's a much bigger city.

We had a primary diagnosis of PDD but we don't know where he is on the spectrum yet. For now the only service we can get for him is speech therapy. It has helped a lot and now he is starting to talk a bit more (to make matters worse we speak to languages at home!) The other thing that has given him confidence with speech is the use of sign language.

He is an amazing little boy. His main obsession is the alphabet. At two he could spell any word (couldn't say a single word though) and now he has been reading for over 6 months. It is really weird but he could read the word papa before even using it! He is extremely smart but it is very difficult socially. Now, Ben's little brother Elliott is crawling all over the place and playing in his endless lines of letters on the floor and we are going through rough times throughout the day. That's when I would like to have help at home. Sometimes, I don't know how to deal with some of his reactions. Ben is not very good with motor skills in general although his little hands are very agile. He started drawing at a young age and I am sure you have guessed what he wants to start doing now? Of course, he wants to be able to write down the whole alphabet! He is very quiet and sweet. He is now more affectionate than ever before. Only to me and my husband but that's a start. He is still quite rigid in his routine but it's not as bad as it used to be. He has made tremendous progress in the past months and we are anxious to see what else he can do in the months to come.

We were devasted when we first found out. The thing is, we new almost from birth that something was not quite right but once we were told what it was, it was tough to swallow. Then, a friend of mine told me this. She said that most people go through life with their kids taking the highway. Everything goes fast, they can't take the time to enjoy anything, before they know it they have reached their goal. She said that with Ben, we would be forced to take the country road and might take a while longer to get where we want but at least we would be enjoying the scenery and spending more time together. Now every morning when I wake up and start another day with my little boys I think of that. It has helped me go through so much.

Thanks for being there and for letting me share my story. We all have a long country road ahead of us but we'll make sure we enjoy every minute of it.
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