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Old 02-25-2013, 07:54 PM   #1
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Default Can someone pls confirm the spelling of this word?

I am from Australia and here we spell alot of words differently to the US eg: labor in the US is spelt labour here, savior is saviour, favorite is favourite, etc. - we have 'ou' instead of just the 'o'. But this next word has me puzzled: can someone please confirm whether you spell moustache in the US as 'mustache'? Thanks in advance
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Old 02-25-2013, 08:17 PM   #2
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Yes, ma'am, mustache it is.

Although I had to check a couple of places. After you look at the word for a while, it doesn't look right no matter how you spell it
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Old 02-25-2013, 08:29 PM   #3
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Sooo .. if you don't spell it mOustache .. then do you ever call it a "mo" for short?
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:32 PM   #4
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I read a lot, and consider myself a good speller, so this post intrigued me. My personal preference for the spelling is the British way.

I found this interesting chart about the spelling of moustache/mustache:

orthography - Spelling of "moustache" - English Language and Usage

PS My hubby has had a moustache for all the 48 years of our marriage, and I've never heard it called a "mo."
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Old 02-25-2013, 10:59 PM   #5
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In England it is Moustache. I have never referred to as a Mo until the recent marketing/charity campaign, even then it took me ages to cotton on to why I kept seeing things with Movember on them!
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:10 PM   #6
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In England it is Moustache. I have never referred to as a Mo until the recent marketing/charity campaign, even then it took me ages to cotton on to why I kept seeing things with Movember on them!
ha that's funny. Perhaps it's just Australia that did the 'mo' thing.
From my days of watching The Bill you say 'tash' to shorten it, right?
I love accents and words peculiar to different regions!
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:46 PM   #7
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I read a lot, and consider myself a good speller, so this post intrigued me. My personal preference for the spelling is the British way.
I spell mustache the American way. My personal preference for spelling is the British way. This post intrigued me too. Usually I find mustaches in crafting to be really creepy, lol.

I am dyslexic. I am a good speller. I use to win spelling bees. When I look at a lot of American words I think it's spelled wrong and my dyslexia kicks in. British words I do not have any trouble with because they are all spelled correctly.
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Old 02-25-2013, 11:51 PM   #8
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Thanks for clarifying the spelling. In Australia, we do shorten moustache to mo - but then again, we tend to shorten just about EVERY word or we add a "y" to it - such as television becomes telly, breakfast is breaky, barbecue is barbie, biscuit is bickie (but you call them cookies) - we are an odd bunch! The reason I asked about moustache was because moustaches have been quite popular in cardmaking and I saw a card with the word 'mustache' stamped on the front in a US magazine and the word looked so weird in its spelling (to me) and well, I just HAD to ask. As an aside, my husband has a moustache and my daughter when she was about 3, used to call it a "musplash" which always made us giggle.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:49 AM   #9
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From my days of watching The Bill you say 'tash' to shorten it, right?
The Bill has done right by you - yes, we Brits would typically say "tash" if we were shortening the word! We probably have far more in common with Australian English though in terms of the things JoBear mentioned (telly, bicky (especially choccy bicky!) etc).
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:59 AM   #10
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I think around this part of the country we shorten it to " 'stache ".

I have a cowboy/rodeo clown friend who has a grand 'stache!
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Old 02-26-2013, 04:07 AM   #11
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This thread makes me want to throw on some Jimmy Buffett!!! Wish I had a pencil thin mustache; the Boston Blackie kind...A two-toned Ricky Ricardo jacket and an autographed picture of Andy Devine...
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Old 02-26-2013, 04:36 AM   #12
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In the States, I've seen t-shirts (aimed at teen girls, I think) that say "Show your Mo" with a big mustache. They're really a big phenomenon here. I thought it was cute at first but really I just don't get the level of popularity the've reached.
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:36 AM   #13
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Love this thread - especially Jo's daughter calling it a musplash when she was little. I used to know someone with the most magnificent handlebar moustache - didn't recognise him the first time I saw him clean-shaven.
The origins of the word are in French and Italian, which would account for the "ou" in the European/Australian and presumably Canadian?? spelling.
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Old 02-26-2013, 10:30 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoBear2 View Post
I am from Australia and here we spell alot of words differently to the US eg: labor in the US is spelt labour here, savior is saviour, favorite is favourite, etc. - we have 'ou' instead of just the 'o'. But this next word has me puzzled: can someone please confirm whether you spell moustache in the US as 'mustache'? Thanks in advance
I wonder if this is a British way to use the past tense of "spelled". I saw another word someone used the other day with "elt" at the end instead of "elled" but I can't remember what it was now.

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... The origins of the word are in French and Italian, which would account for the "ou" in the European/Australian and presumably Canadian?? spelling.
I do use the British spelling in most cases, especially for my own personal writing, however, I will use American spellings at work if that's the preference of the boss. So, I would spell it "moustache". We also usually shorten it down to "stache" here as well.
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:08 AM   #15
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I've seen both spellings, but prefer the "ou" version, myself! Maybe it depends on where in this huge country you grew up...? I love regional variations in language! When I first moved to Upstate New York (yes, they capitalize the "U" here), I could NOT figure out what in the heck "sneaks" were. Turns out that they were referring to their tennis shoes (as we called them in Southern California (yes, they capitalize that, as well) - or sneakers or trainers or whatever else you know them as... Sort of like: Is it "Coke" or "pop" or "soda" where you live? And when did "yup" get to be a replacement for "you're welcome" or "see you later" (EVERYONE in Syracuse does this! "Thanks for the ride." "Yup." "See you later." "Yup") These things amuse me greatly (but then, I'm easily amused...)
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:23 AM   #16
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I've seen both spellings, but prefer the "ou" version, myself! Maybe it depends on where in this huge country you grew up...? I love regional variations in language! When I first moved to Upstate New York (yes, they capitalize the "U" here), I could NOT figure out what in the heck "sneaks" were. Turns out that they were referring to their tennis shoes (as we called them in Southern California (yes, they capitalize that, as well) - or sneakers or trainers or whatever else you know them as... Sort of like: Is it "Coke" or "pop" or "soda" where you live? And when did "yup" get to be a replacement for "you're welcome" or "see you later" (EVERYONE in Syracuse does this! "Thanks for the ride." "Yup." "See you later." "Yup") These things amuse me greatly (but then, I'm easily amused...)
I'm with you, Sue. I'm easily amused also.

I love all these regional/cultural things about language. I'll bet we could keep this thread going for weeks about it. (I'd like that!)

Here in Okie - homa where I live, some folks say something that cracks me up. Example, I would say "Will you take me to the store?"

They say, "Will you carry me to the store?" Or, "He came over and carried me to the store." I get such a picture in my mind when I hear someone say this.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:28 PM   #17
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many (many!) years ago I worked in a hotel in Scotland and most of the staff lived in. On my first day my supervisor asked me "Do you want me to come and knock you up in the morning?"
"what the!"
Apparently "knocked up" to her meant knocking on my door to get me up and not what I thought it was ..

Another spelling one is the plural of roof. I grew up in the 80s in regional Australia and was taught that the plural of roof was "rooves" .. I mentioned this in another forum I visit and was surprised that there was only a handful of others used it or even knew of this variation. I thought everyone did it that way.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:18 PM   #18
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My favorite, all-time, best, most amusing encounter with language was a young man (big, strapping, 6'4") that I met who was from Texas (complete with the drawl/twang), but had spent four years living in Scotland (and picked up the brogue and some of the vocabulary), and said to me (please use your imagination here): "I'm no stupid - I can teach the boy to work hard and be a man but, at the end o' the day, I canna help him wi' his homework..."

Well, alrighty, then!
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:22 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Metalcharm View Post
many (many!) years ago I worked in a hotel in Scotland and most of the staff lived in. On my first day my supervisor asked me "Do you want me to come and knock you up in the morning?"
"what the!"
Apparently "knocked up" to her meant knocking on my door to get me up and not what I thought it was ..

Another spelling one is the plural of roof. I grew up in the 80s in regional Australia and was taught that the plural of roof was "rooves" .. I mentioned this in another forum I visit and was surprised that there was only a handful of others used it or even knew of this variation. I thought everyone did it that way.
Your story reminded me of the autobiography I read about Maria Von Trapp (the "Sound of Music" nun who married the Captain). She wrote about learning English on the ship on the voyage to America, and how confusing it was. If it's foot/feet, why isn't it root/reet? If it's mouse/mice, why isn't it house/hice? I'm really, really glad that English is my native language - we have as any exceptions as we do rules! How does ANYone ever learn it?!
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:35 PM   #20
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This thread makes me want to throw on some Jimmy Buffett!!! Wish I had a pencil thin mustache; the Boston Blackie kind...A two-toned Ricky Ricardo jacket and an autographed picture of Andy Devine...
LOL! Another Jimmy Buffett fan here.
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:07 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metalcharm View Post
many (many!) years ago I worked in a hotel in Scotland and most of the staff lived in. On my first day my supervisor asked me "Do you want me to come and knock you up in the morning?"
"what the!"
Apparently "knocked up" to her meant knocking on my door to get me up and not what I thought it was ..

Another spelling one is the plural of roof. I grew up in the 80s in regional Australia and was taught that the plural of roof was "rooves" .. I mentioned this in another forum I visit and was surprised that there was only a handful of others used it or even knew of this variation. I thought everyone did it that way.
Oh my gosh, I laughed my head off at the "knock you up in the morning"! Gosh he/she would have been mortified if they knew what that meant in Australia!

I also spell the plural of roof as rooves. My late father was a stickler for using the correct word and I remember him saying the word. Mmm, might have a look into that word - I just assumed EVERYBODY says "rooves" although when I look at it, it looks weird.

Re cat_woman: I wonder if this is a British way to use the past tense of "spelled". I saw another word someone used the other day with "elt" at the end instead of "elled" but I can't remember what it was now.

In Australia, we use "spelt" or "spelled" interchangeably as the past tense of spell but my understanding is that in the USA, the past tense of "spelled" is preferred. But when spell carries the sense to temporarily relieve (someone) from work, spelled is the preferred form in the English-speaking world. Spelt also refers to a type of flour that is wheat-free and very low in gluten.

I do a lot of crosswords so I have a fascination with words and the differences between English-speaking countries. Some words we spell the same here but pronounce them differently, for example, buoy is pronounced BOY here but BOO-IE in the USA. One time on a post here at SCS, I used the word "chook", and no-one could understand what I was talking about. I had no idea that it was Australian slang because I grew up on a farm and we had chooks - and I still have a card game that belonged to my late father which is called "Chook Chook" (circa 1920). This card game is now part of Museum Victoria's collection of Parlour Games from early in the 20th Century (Victoria is a State in Australia where I live). By the way, a chook is a chicken!
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:19 AM   #22
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many (many!) years ago I worked in a hotel in Scotland and most of the staff lived in. On my first day my supervisor asked me "Do you want me to come and knock you up in the morning?"
Interestingly we (Brits) do say "knocked up" as a slightly perjorative term for pregnancy. I think the Scots use is reasonably distinctive. I have another couple of "rude" examples (one in each direction) spring to mind instantly but I don't want to offend anyone!

Pavement is an interesting one, an American who told her kids to walk on the pavement would presumably be seen as a dangerous mom. To us, the pavement is the raised walkway along the side of the road so the instruction "Walk on the pavement" is just telling your kids to be safe.

Two nations divided by a common language and all that
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:46 AM   #23
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I've always spelled it "moustache." It looks strange to me spelled the other way.
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Old 02-27-2013, 03:31 AM   #24
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ha that's funny. Perhaps it's just Australia that did the 'mo' thing.
From my days of watching The Bill you say 'tash' to shorten it, right?
I love accents and words peculiar to different regions!
I've heard it called a "Stash" here in the USA.
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:26 AM   #25
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I was interested to see the spelled/spelt. I tend to go for spelled purely because of spelt being a grain! But I know there's another word that always causes me some angst whether to go with the -ed or -t ending - but for the life of me I just can't remember it now.
Someone pointed out the difference between flashlights and torches (American usage) to me after a post I made last year. Over here both a battery-operated light and Olympic-style flaming torch are both torches.

I'm still trying to find an American equivalent for what, over here, are called quays, pronounced keys. Merriam-Webster says
Quote:
a structure built parallel to the bank of a waterway for use as a landing place
but here it also refers to the roads running alongside the river, and a couple of SCS-ers I've met up with have been puzzled by the term.


This thread is starting to remind me of the very first thread I ever actually subscribed to here : Need help with British terms... Typical of me that it's a language one rather than a crafty one!!
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:44 AM   #26
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I was interested to see the spelled/spelt. I tend to go for spelled purely because of spelt being a grain! But I know there's another word that always causes me some angst whether to go with the -ed or -t ending - but for the life of me I just can't remember it now.
Someone pointed out the difference between flashlights and torches (American usage) to me after a post I made last year. Over here both a battery-operated light and Olympic-style flaming torch are both torches.

I'm still trying to find an American equivalent for what, over here, are called quays, pronounced keys. Merriam-Webster says but here it also refers to the roads running alongside the river, and a couple of SCS-ers I've met up with have been puzzled by the term.


This thread is starting to remind me of the very first thread I ever actually subscribed to here : Need help with British terms... Typical of me that it's a language one rather than a crafty one!!
Is it burned vs. burnt ? Here's a link to a site that you might find useful: Grammarist
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Old 02-27-2013, 04:34 PM   #27
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What an interesting thread! We Canadians spell many words the British way, like humour, colour, MOUSTACHE! and a lot of other things. We follow the British spellings for the most part. We 'celebrate' Mo-vember; the monthof prostate awareness. But I have also heard moustache verbally shortened to 'stash'.

However even from our shore to shore we have tons of local idioms that don't translate very well... especially the east coast. The Newfoundlanders have their own language I'm sure, plus a great accent.

One variation that I always wonder about is the pronunciation of 'lieutenant'. I have to agree with the Americans on how to say that... it makes sense to say 'lew-tenant' Canadians are supposed to say 'left-enant' but I am one Canadian who doesn't... shame on me !
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:58 PM   #28
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I have a friend from West Virginia and she calls a shopping cart at the grocery store a basket. I had never heard this.
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Old 02-27-2013, 07:07 PM   #29
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I have a friend from West Virginia and she calls a shopping cart at the grocery store a basket. I had never heard this.
Hey, I'm just across the way from you in Oklahoma, and lots of people here call them "baskets" too.

You do hear them called "shopping carts" or just "carts", but a fair number of us call them "baskets."
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:06 PM   #30
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lol I'd call it a shopping trolley
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:42 PM   #31
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lol I'd call it a shopping trolley
Yes, me too. There are differences between states here in Australia for some things too. Years ago, when I travelled to Perth in Western Australia, my girlfriend didn't know what a milk bar was (it is just a little corner store that sells basic things like newspapers, magazines, milk, bread, icecreams, lollies and a few basic grocery items). In WA, they call it a deli! But a deli here in Victoria is a shop that sells fancy cheeses, salami, ham, preserved produce such as olives etc.

I bought a Stampendous Christmas stamp a little while ago and didn't notice until I had the stamp in my hot little hand that the sentiment said: "Joy to the World, the Savior reigns". And of course, because we spell Savior in Australia as Saviour, I can't bring myself to use the stamp....sigh.....
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:18 PM   #32
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By the way, a chook is a chicken!
I knew that. ! I guess I am one of the SCS's in the know, lol.

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I have a friend from West Virginia and she calls a shopping cart at the grocery store a basket. I had never heard this.
I am from the Ozarks in Missouri. I always call a shopping cart a basket. It is funny because my DH will ask me if we need a cart. I am like "Yes, we need a basket." He grabs me one of those little baskets, ROFL! I will say "No, we need a basket because we have to buy a bag of kitty litter." He stands there so confused. I will say "We need a big basket." When we first started dating he would actually go look for a big basket, lol. Now, he's gotten a little better and will grab a cart. He has lived in this area for twenty years, lol. He still is not trained in the Southern language.
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:31 AM   #33
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However even from our shore to shore we have tons of local idioms that don't translate very well...
True in the UK too and we're a whole lot smaller than either Canada or the US! I live in North East England but I didn't grow up here - if I walk down the street behind a couple of true "Geordies" (natives of Newcastle upon Tyne) it can take a good while before I realise I'm not following tourists speaking a foreign language! "Gan yem?" is not something most people would recognise as English but to a Geordie that's a perfectly reasonable way of saying "Shall we go home?" There are some wonderful dialect words here, my favourite is "dunch" (meaning to hit or crash as in "I dunched my car").
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Old 02-28-2013, 03:23 AM   #34
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True in the UK too and we're a whole lot smaller than either Canada or the US! I live in North East England but I didn't grow up here - if I walk down the street behind a couple of true "Geordies" (natives of Newcastle upon Tyne) it can take a good while before I realise I'm not following tourists speaking a foreign language! "Gan yem?" is not something most people would recognise as English but to a Geordie that's a perfectly reasonable way of saying "Shall we go home?" There are some wonderful dialect words here, my favourite is "dunch" (meaning to hit or crash as in "I dunched my car").
Oh my, yes! I probably have more of an Irish accent now than I used to - when I worked in the UK I passed as English. But I was so embarrassed when I was working up near Doncaster and had enormous trouble understanding one of the lads who worked on the estate. I don't think he'd ever been outside of Yorkshire, and I felt such a fool having to ask him to repeat things a couple of times when I had trouble understanding him, between accent and dialect.
Dunch is a wonderful word - quite onomatopoeic!!
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Old 02-28-2013, 05:27 AM   #35
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I bought a Stampendous Christmas stamp a little while ago and didn't notice until I had the stamp in my hot little hand that the sentiment said: "Joy to the World, the Savior reigns". And of course, because we spell Savior in Australia as Saviour, I can't bring myself to use the stamp....sigh.....
That would bother me too! I am rather an*l about spelling. And grammar. And the fact that I just made a sentence that isn't a sentence... :O
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Old 02-28-2013, 06:19 AM   #36
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...and had enormous trouble understanding one of the lads who worked on the estate. I don't think he'd ever been outside of Yorkshire
I hear rumour that The Full Monty had subtitles for some US audiences - proof that Yorkshire can be troublesome
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Old 02-28-2013, 06:35 AM   #37
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I hear rumour that The Full Monty had subtitles for some US audiences - proof that Yorkshire can be troublesome
Yeah, well, there are US shows that put on captions for US audiences, so, you know... (Some of the shows here caption anyone who has an accent that sounds like anything other than from Kansas.)
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:26 AM   #38
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I hear rumour that The Full Monty had subtitles for some US audiences - proof that Yorkshire can be troublesome
I know this is going off topic, but... on this topic, the best movie for this is Snatch. I loved Brad Pitt in that movie (well I love Brad Pitt in any movie ).
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:12 PM   #39
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What an interesting thread! We Canadians spell many words the British way, like humour, colour, MOUSTACHE! and a lot of other things. We follow the British spellings for the most part. We 'celebrate' Mo-vember; the monthof prostate awareness. But I have also heard moustache verbally shortened to 'stash'.

However even from our shore to shore we have tons of local idioms that don't translate very well... especially the east coast. The Newfoundlanders have their own language I'm sure, plus a great accent.

One variation that I always wonder about is the pronunciation of 'lieutenant'. I have to agree with the Americans on how to say that... it makes sense to say 'lew-tenant' Canadians are supposed to say 'left-enant' but I am one Canadian who doesn't... shame on me !
This is such a wonderful topic. My Dad's side of the family came from Notingham and my Mum's side is from Cornwall. Moustache is correct ..colour, humour, neighbour..all good. I was a Lieutenant in our local Girl Guide Company and my nick-name was Lefty. But in my neck of the woods we have a dialect called 'The Baddow Slang'. It is kind of a mixture of English, Irish, Scottish, Newfuneze and Ozark all rolled up in one with an occasional 'eh' thrown in for good measure... as in 'beauty eh!" When I first met my hubby he was fresh from the east coast..wow! Total language barrier there! LOL
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Old 03-02-2013, 05:31 PM   #40
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G'way b'y. We don't have an accent in Newfoundland!

(...I dies at dis tread!)


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However even from our shore to shore we have tons of local idioms that don't translate very well... especially the east coast. The Newfoundlanders have their own language I'm sure, plus a great accent.
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