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Old 07-05-2006, 09:15 PM   #132
dessertlady
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Originally Posted by barbf
My 9 year old son had a lot of trouble in the regular classroom this past year, that environment was too much for him and he became disruptive. So we started the IEP process. The school district did lots of testing and diagnosed him with ASD. Per his IEP, he was in the special ed room all day, except for gym, music, and art. The special ed room was also too stimulating for him and at the beginning of May his IEP was changed so that he was put in the Excel room (only autistic kids). That was a nightmare. The kids in there are MUCH less verbal than Aaron, there was a lot of yelling & screaming by the other kids in there. The school district said that next year they are changing the Excel room structure - there will be 2 rooms, one for grades K-2 the other 3-5 grades, and that this will be a much better environment for him.

We had been to see a pediatrician in our town about Aaron about 9 months ago as we suspected that he had a form of autism. This doctor was supposedly the "expert" in town, and his advice was to look on the internet for information and to start my own support group. Jerk. We were so dissatisfied with that pediatrician, that we went to a pediatrician in Fargo, ND (closest town with more medical services - we are in north central MN). This doctor immediately had blood work done, and MRI, an EEG, a neuropsych evaluation, and an evaluation by a child psychiatrist. So we are in the middle of having lots of testing done. The MRI & EEG were normal. The blood work showed high TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), so today we were back in Fargo meeting with an endocrinologist who put him on thyroid medication. Last Wednesday were were also in Fargo for a whole day of neuropsych testing - can't wait until we get those results. The neuropsychologist made a comment that although he doesn't have the results of all the testing, he thinks Aaron may be too verbal for a diagnosis of autism.

So now we're really confused. I had been told that the school district is quick to put a child on the autism spectrum because then they get increased funding. Like I said, I'm really anxious for all this testing to be done and to actually have a medical diagnosis. Another thing the neuropsychologist said - he was surprised that Aaron could get special ed services without a medical diagnosis! I had been so impressed with the people at the school district, and it really seemed like everything they were doing was the best thing for Aaron - but now I'm not sure I trust them. I guess I probably trusted them "blindly" because both my parents were teachers, and I naturally thought that all in the education field only have the child's best interest in mind, and I never thought of questioning them. My husband is just the opposite - he doesn't trust any of them (they are somewhat condescending to him - that really sets him off).

All these evaluations and testing are taking so much time - Aaron's appointment with the child psychiatrist isn't until the end of September (although it is likely this will be bumped up when other patients cancel appointments). I will be contacting the neuropsychologist's office in the next day or two to find out results of his testing. I'm trying to hold off on changing my opinion of the school district until we have a definate medical diagnosis.

At times Aaron also has some severe behavioral issues. Themrs - I can totally relate to your story about your 3 year old. Aaron has had some terrible outbursts. And he's getting bigger and more difficult to control.

Nice to hear we're not alone.

Barb
Question - how did the school diagnose him? We've been to several districts and none have had the ability to dx. They all have a school psych, but none has ever attempted to dx. IMO, I would check on that, they maybe be playing a little loose with the rules and trying to force you into something because you were "blindly" trusting them. Also, being verbal doesn't rule out autism. DS is very verbal and has AS/HFA. Most kids on the high end that I've dealt with are extremely verbal.

Anyway, good luck with the rest of the testing and the school!

On a happy note for us. DS's skills trainer has been out of town for the last week and was supposed to be back today. He had a sub last week and it went pretty well. Last time he had a sub trainer he spent most of the day in the quiet room being upset. Today when he went to school the skills trainer wasn't there, cell phone started buzzing (he had called last night) voice mail, he was stuck in LA with plane problems. They tried to get a sub, but couldn't. DS made it through the day okay, not great, but not bad This is a major step up from 6 months ago. I'm so proud that he even wanted to try and stay at school without his trainer!
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